World War I Honour Roll

Note on Frederick Horace Reed's membership application in 1918

Faced with the dilemma of how to commemorate the dead, many organisations created Honour Rolls or memorials. The Institution created an ornate board, recording the names of its war dead, which is hung on the first floor landing. Here, each is listed by name and date of death. Under each name are their membership dates, their professional post at time of joining, their service posting and any details of their death or medals awarded to them. Where they exist, a contemporaneous obituary can also be read. Stories to commemorate the men will be posted on the archive blog

Membership information is taken from our application forms, service and death information from their official service records. The obituaries were written by the IMechE. Where contradictions exist eg on date of death these have been left unless there is clear evidence as to which piece of information is correct.

1,270 Institution members and 8 staff members went on active service: 7.1% of members died; and 12.5% of staff died. All the membership records for the war period are available online. In 1916 the Institution's Council decided that any man on active service who was approaching/over the age of 28 could apply for Associate Membership without having to sit an examination.

 


1914

Thomas Arnold Venning: 5th September

Associate Member 1899.

Assistant Engineer, HMS ''Hebe'', Mediterranean Fleet.

Engineer Lieutenant Commander, HMS ''Pathfinder''.

Torpedoed by a submarine in the North Sea.

Awarded: 1914 Star.

1914 Obituary 

Engineer Lieutenant-Commander THOMAS ARNOLD YENNING [sic, V], R.N., was born at St. Feock, Truro, on 4th January 1875.

He received his education at St. Feock School and under private tuition at Truro.

At the age of sixteen he was apprenticed to Messrs. Pool, Skinner, and Williams, engineers, of Falmouth. During this period he attended classes at the Falmouth Technical School, and gained many certificates and prizes.

On the expiration of his apprenticeship in 1896 he entered the Royal Navy as assistant engineer, having passed the competitive examination held at Greenwich, and his first appointment was to H.M.S. "Victory" at Portsmouth. Since then he served in various ships on Home and Foreign Stations.

In 1901 he was promoted to be Engineer Lieutenant, and early in the current year Engineer Lieutenant-Commander. His first foreign service was in H.M.S. "Undaunted" on the China Station from 1897 to 1901, and during that period he served in connexion with the Boxer rising.

He also served in H.M.S. "Encounter," having previously been appointed to her while building at Devonport, and left in her for the Australian Station, where he remained until 1908.

On his return to England he served in other ships, the last one being H.M.S. "Pathfinder" in 1912, in which his life was lost through a German submarine attack about 20 miles off St. Abb's Head on 5th September 1914, in his fortieth year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1900.

Rowland/Roland Dryden McGroarty: 7th September

Graduate 1909.

Apprentice, WF Stanley & Co.

Pioneer, East African Pioneers.

Died of wounds sustained in British East Africa.

Awarded: 1914 Star, Victory Medal and a British War Medal.

Note: Rowland on war record, Roland on IMechE records.

1914 Obituary 

ROLAND DRYDEN MCGROARTY was born at Norwood, London, on 8th April 1889.

He was educated at Selhurst Park College, and followed a course of technical education from 1903-1904 at the Beckenham Technical Institute.

He started on his apprenticeship in November 1904 with Messrs. W. F. Stanley and Co., Ltd., and from 1908-1909 he went through a course of drawing office practice at the Goldsmiths' College, New Cross.

He next joined the staff of a water-softening firm, and in February 1914 was sent by Messrs. Lamberts, Ltd., of Southwark Street, to British East Africa, on railway construction.

When war broke out he volunteered at Nairobi, and became a motor-cyclist scout. In the fighting near Tsavo on 7th September 1914 he was wounded and captured by the Germans, and subsequently died, at the age of twenty-five.

He contributed two Papers, which were read at the Graduates' Meetings one in March 1912, on "The Purification and Softening of Water," for which he was awarded a prize by the Council, and the other, in November 1913, on "Modern Methods of Steam Raising."

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1909.

Ronald Mcleod Colin McNaughton: 10th September

Associate 1914.

Engineer/Draughtsman, Saunderson & Mills Ltd.

Lance Corporal, East Anglian Signal Company, Royal Engineers.

Died at home from an accident on his way to join the Colours.

Awarded: 1914 Star, Victory Medal and a British War Medal.

1914 Obituary 

RONALD MCLEOD COLIN MCNAUGHTON was born at Irvine, Ayrshire, on 23rd January 1891.

He was educated at Kelvinside Academy, Glasgow, and at the Bedford Grammar School from 1907 to 1909, where he specialized in engineering, completing his course in 1912 and 1913 at the Bedford Evening Institute.

He served an apprenticeship of four years - 1909 to 1913 — at the works of Messrs. Grafton and Co., and of six months, 1913, at Messrs. Sanderson and Mills, Ltd., Elstow Engineering Works, Bedford.

In November of that year he was taken on as a draughtsman by the same firm.

Mr. McNaughton was a lance-corporal in the Territorials [sic, Territorial’s]. He was on his way to join the Colours at Bury St. Edmund's, having volunteered for Active Service, when, on 9th September 1914, at the age of twenty-three, he met with a sudden death, the result of a motor-cycle accident.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1914.

Edward Teshmaker Busk: 5th November

Member 1914.

Assistant Engineer Physicist, Royal Aircraft Factory.

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers (helped prepare for Arras).

Prior to the War, 2nd Lieutenant London Electrical Engineers Territorial’s (from 1911).

Awarded: 1914 Star.

1915 Obituary 

EDWARD TESHMAKER BUSK was born at Winchmore Hill, Middlesex, on 8th March 1886.

He was educated at Bilton Grange School and at Harrow, and followed a three years' course of engineering at the University of Cambridge, taking the First Class Mechanical Sciences Tripos.

In 1909 he started an apprenticeship of two years with Messrs. J. and E. Hall, Dartford, and in 1912 became assistant engineer in charge of Physical Experimental Work at the Royal Aircraft Factory, South Farnborough. It was in this capacity that he devised several valuable improvements in the mechanism of aeroplanes and the disposition of their parts tending to complete stability without material loss of efficiency.

By the autumn of 1913 he had carried his researches so far that any aeroplane built to his design would give such a result, and in November 1913 was for the first tune [sic, time] able to snake [sic, make] uncontrolled flights of several hours' duration in winds up to thirty-eight miles an hour. On one occasion Colonel Seely, the then Secretary of State for War, was his passenger, and he later made demonstration flights before the King and Queen. After flying with Colonel Sykes, the Commanding Officer of the Royal Flying Corps, from the Royal Aircraft Factory, Farnborough, to Salisbury Plain and back, both passenger and flyer leaving the aeroplane to control itself whilst they wrote notes throughout the journey, he persuaded the authorities to take the matter up as having been tested and demonstrated in practical form.

Mr. Busk was flying his own stable aeroplane at Aldershot, when, on 5th November 1914, it caught fire in the air, causing his death, in his twenty-ninth year.

He had in 1911 received a Commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the London Electrical Engineers, Territorials.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1914.

Henry Ivanhoe Vandell: 11th November

Graduate 1913.

Mechanical Engineer, Western Electric Co. and 2nd Lieutenant, GRO having joined voluntarily as a reserve officer, Officers Training Corps, 14th December 1912.

2nd Lieutenant, Northamptonshire Regiment,1st Battalion.

Died near Ypres.

Awarded: 1914 Star.

1914 Obituary 

Lieutenant HENRY IVANHOE VANDELL was born at New Brompton, Kent, on 8th December 1890.

He served his apprenticeship at H.M. Royal Dockyard, Chatham, from 1905 to 1910, where he also received four years' theoretical tuition, afterwards continuing his studies at East London College (University of London).

From January 1912 to August 1914 he held an important position with the Western Electric Co., Ltd., North Woolwich, in the shop expense production department.

Lieutenant Vandell, who was in the Northamptonshire Regiment, was killed in action in the neighbourhood of Ypres about 11th November 1914, in his twenty-fourth year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1913.

Herbert Hugo Schneider: 5th December

Graduate 1909; Associate 1914.

Assistant Maintenance Engineer, Sierra Leone Government Rail Way.

Royal Engineers, Survey Depot.

Died in Cameroon.

1914 Obituary 

Lieutenant HERBERT HUGO SCHNEIDER, R.E., was born in East Dulwich, London, on 5th January 1888.

He was educated at the Bedales School, Petersfield, Hants; and received his technical education at the Crystal Palace School of Practical Engineering, after which he served an apprenticeship of fifteen months in the shops, specializing in electrical motors and generators.

He was an assistant to Messrs Barry, Leslie and Egerton for three years (1907-1910), when he joined the Special Reserve for one year as 2nd Lieutenant, Royal Engineers.

In 1911 he went to West Africa, where he served as Assistant Engineer on the Lagos Railway, Northern Extension, Northern Nigeria.

After his leave of absence he returned to West Africa in 1912 as Assistant Engineer on the Sierra Leone Government Railway; in 1914 he was appointed Surveyor to the Survey of Northern Nigeria, and was still there on the outbreak of the War, when he left to take part in the operations in West Africa.

He was killed in action in the Cameroons on 5th December 1914, in his twenty-seventh year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1909, and an Associate Member in 1914.





1915

Captain Charles Gerald Taylor RN, MVO: 24th January

Member 1900.

Engineer, HMS ''Lion''.

Engineer Captain, HMS ''Tiger''.

Killed during the Battle of Dogger Bank.

1915 Obituary 

Engineer-Captain CHARLES GERALD TAYLOR, M.V.O., R.N., was born at Ruabon, North Wales, on 8th May 1863.

He was educated at the Grammar School at Ruabon, after which he went to Portsmouth Dockyard as engineer student in H.M.S. "Marlborough" from 1879 to 1885. In the latter year he joined the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, and on 1st July 1886 was granted a commission as assistant-engineer, with seniority.

He received an appointment to H.M.S. "Carysfort," Mediterranean Fleet, in May 1887, and remained on that ship until May 1890, when he was invalided home with malarial fever. On 30th October of the same year he joined H.M.S. "Gossamer," remaining until January 1891, when he went to H.M.S. "Imperieuse," China Station, having been promoted to engineer, with seniority in 1890.

He was next appointed to H.M.S. "St. George" in June 1894, and after three months was transferred to H.M.S. "Banshee." A year later he joined H.M.S. "Quail," and remained in that ship on her transfer to the North America and West Indies Station.

In February 1898 he was appointed to H.M.S. "Renown," Halifax Dockyard, and in December 1900 became Chief Engineer, with seniority. He returned to England in March 1903, and in April of that year he joined H.M.S. "Aurora," taking, under the new nomenclature, the rank of Engineer-Lieutenant, with seniority 1st September 1890.

In August 1904 he was transferred to H.M.S. "Racer," Royal Naval College, Osborne, being at the same time a Member of the Committee on the Extension of the Training of Officers' New Scheme. In this capacity he received the commendation of the Lords of the Admiralty for the work done by the Committee, and was promoted to the rank of Engineer-Commander on 30th December 1904.

He went to sea again in September 1907 on board H.M.S. "Cumberland " (cadets' training ship), and in April 1908 was appointed to H.M.S. "Espiêgle," Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, where his work once more received the special recognition of the Lords of the Admiralty. On 10th February 1911 be was made a Member of the 4th Class of the Royal Victorian Order.

In March 1911 he was appointed to H.M.S. "Superb," in the Home Fleet, being promoted to Engineer-Captain, with seniority on 7th February 1912, in which capacity he was retained by the Admiralty for the new scheme of training officers for the Royal Navy.

In October 1912 he joined H.M.S. "Hercules," additional for service on the staff of the Vice-Admiral Commanding the Second Battle Squadron, and in August of the following year was made Engineer-Captain in Command, Royal Naval College, Keyham.

In September 1914 he joined the staff of the Vice-Admiral Commanding the First Battle-Cruiser Squadron, and was present in the capacity of engineering expert and adviser to Vice-Admiral Sir David Beatty in all subsequent services. It was on board H.M.S. "Tiger," in the engagement of 24th January 1915, in the North Sea, that he met his death by gun-fire, in his fifty-second year, being the only officer to lose his life on the occasion.

He was elected a Member of this Institution in 1900.

Oswold Neville Tebbutt: 15th March

Graduate 1914.

Cement Works Manager, East Anglian Cement Co.

Captain, Cambridgeshire Regiment, 1st Battalion.

Killed in action at St Eloi.

1915 Obituary 

Captain OSWOLD NEVILLE TEBBUTT was born at Cambridge on 15th October 1890.

He was educated at St. Faith's School, Cambridge, at Northdown Hill School, Margate, and at the New School, Abbotsholme. He matriculated at the University of London in 1908, and entered McGill University, Montreal, in the same year, graduating Bachelor of Science (Chemical Engineering) in 1912.

In the latter year he returned to England, and became manager of the Shepreth Branch of the East Anglian Cement Co., Ltd., and later manager of the Linley Branch.

In September 1912 he joined the 1st Battalion Cambridgeshire Regiment, and was gazetted Captain in September 1914.

While reconnoitring at St. Eloi he was killed by shell on the night of 15th March 1915, in his twenty-fifth year.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1914.

Frederick Hollingsworth: 26th April

Graduate 1905; Associate Member 1912.

Chief Engineer, Vacuum Oil Co., South Africa.

Lieutenant, Rhodesia Regiment, 1st Machine Gun Section.

Killed in action, South Africa/Namibia.

1915 Obituary 

Lieutenant FREDERICK HOLLINGSWORTH was born in London on 5th March 1884.

He was educated at the Stationers' Company's School, Stroud Green, London, from 1892 to 1899, and then received private tuition for one year, which was followed by a technical course at the Durham College of Science from 1900 to 1901.

In 1900 he began a term of apprenticeship with Messrs. Robert Stephenson and Co., Ltd., Newcastle-on-Tyne and Darlington, and on its completion in 1905 he joined the staff of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, at their running sheds at Fratton, Portsmouth, and also attended the Portsmouth Technical School.

In 1907 he became technical assistant of the railway department of the Vacuum Oil Co., Ltd., London and in December of the same year he was appointed chief engineer of the South African branch of the company. This position he held until May 1912, when he became assistant district locomotive superintendent of the Beira and Mashonaland and Rhodesia Railways at Umtali, and in the following year was transferred to the position of works manager of the Umtali workshops.

In October 1914 he was granted extended leave of absence, to enable him to proceed on active service with the 1st Rhodesian Regiment.

Lieutenant Hollingsworth was killed in action at Trekkopjes, German South-West Africa, on 26th April 1915, at the age of thirty-one.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1905, and an Associate Member in 1912.

William Martin-Davey: 7th May

Member 1912.

Consulting Engineer and Naval Architect.

Civilian casualty of the sinking of RMS ''Lusitania''.

1915 Obituary 

WILLIAM MARTIN-DAVEY was born at North Shields on 6th January 1863.

He was educated at Aberdeen Park College, London, and received his technical education at the Birkbeck Institute, London.

In 1878 he served an apprenticeship of six months in the drawing office of Messrs. Sewards, of Millwall, after which he entered the workshops of Messrs. John Stewart and Son, Black wall, where he remained until 1883.

In that year he was employed for a short time by Messrs. White and Co., Albert Dock, London, and then sailed as junior engineer in the employ of the British India Steam Navigation Co. until 1886, when he obtained a second class Board of Trade engineer's certificate.

He thereupon became second engineer on board a Spanish steamer, and ultimately chief engineer on taking his first class Board of Trade certificate of competency.

He was next appointed a ship and engineer surveyor to Lloyd's Register of Shipping in 1887, but resigned the appointment four years later to commence practice as a consulting engineer and naval architect in Liverpool.

Subsequently he became senior partner in the firm of Martin-Davey and Herd, of Liverpool. Thinking that there was about to be an immense development of the mercantile marine service of the United States and Canada, following upon the opening of the Panama Canal, he decided to go to Vancouver, B.C.; where he opened new offices.

In the early part of 1915 he was making a semi-business visit to this country, accompanied by his wife and only son, when all three became victims in the loss occasioned by the torpedoing of the R.M.S. "Lusitania" by a German submarine on 7th May 1915. He was fifty-two years of age.

He was elected a Member of this Institution in 1912.

Colin Stanley Fenton: 7th May

Graduate 1908.

Marine Engineer.

Civilian casualty of the sinking of RMS ''Lusitania''.

John Wilson: 9th/10th May

Associate Member 1914.

Assistant Engineer, AEG Electric Co.

Private, Gordon Highlanders, 1st Battalion (?).

Died of wounds.

Herbert Henry Ford: 22nd May

Associate Member 1908; Member 1913.

Engineer, Sir W Arrol and Co, Crane Works.

Royal Scots (?).

Killed in the Gretna Green/Quintinshill rail disaster, the victims of which were mainly men of the Royal Scots.

Note: Ford is listed in our records as being a casualty of war, although this cannot be verified.

1915 Obituary 

HERBERT HENRY FORD was born at Bath on 3rd March 1870.

He was educated at the Portway Schools in that city, and received his technical education at the Bath Technical School.

In 1883 he began an apprenticeship in the works of Messrs. Day and Co., at Bath, and on its completion in 1889 he worked for some time at Liverpool and Barrow-in-Furness, fitting and erecting machinery.

For one year he gained sea experience in the ships of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co., and next was engaged by Messrs. J. and G. Thomson, Clydebank, on boiler erection and trial trips.

In 1894 he started in the employment of Messrs. Stothert and Pitt, crane makers, Bath, where he rose to be their outside manager. In this capacity he carried out many important contracts, both at home and abroad, and specially supervised the installation of the mechanical and electrical work on several cantilever cranes of the largest capacity in this country.

After about fifteen years' successful work with this firm he joined the staff of Sir William Arrol and Co., Ltd., Glasgow, as outside engineering manager, and in 1913 he became manager of the crane work department of the firm.

His death took place on 22nd May 1915, at the age of forty-five, as the result of the railway accident near Gretna, when returning from a business visit to London.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1908, and was transferred to full Membership in 1913.

Edward Haile: 30th May

Graduate 1911.

Pupil, London, Brighton and South East Railway Locomotive Works.

Enlisted 3rd Oct 1914.

Sergeant, Royal Marines (Royal Naval Division), Divisional Signal Company, Divisional Engineer, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force (from 1st Mar 1915).

Died of wounds in the 11th Casualty Clearing Station of a gunshot wound to chest. Transferred to Lancashire Landing Cemetery, Helles, Gallipoli Peninsula.

Awarded: Certificate by General Officer Commanding, Royal Naval Division for Gallant and Courageous Conduct.

1915 Obituary 

EDWARD HAILE was born in London on 22nd September 1890, and was educated at Wilson's Grammar School, Camberwell.

He served a pupilage [sic, pupillage] from 1908 to 1911 under Mr. D. Earle Marsh at the Brighton Locomotive Works of the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway, and after its completion he occupied various positions in the Locomotive Running Department until October 1914, when be joined the ranks of the Divisional Engineers of the Royal Naval Division, subsequently becoming sergeant.

On 29th May 1915, while taking part in the fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula, he received wounds which resulted in his death on the following day, in his twenty-fifth year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1911.

David Gilbert: 21 June

Graduate 1913; Associate Member 1914.

Assistant Test Engineer, Reavell & Co.

Enlisted 23rd Oct 1914.

Lance Corporal/2nd Corporal, Royal Marines, 1st Field Company, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, Divisional Engineers.

Died in the Military Hospital, Citadel, Cairo from Paratyphoid. Transferred to hospital 3rd Jun 1915.

Father: late David Gilbert, served at Gallipoli.

1915 Obituary

DAVID GILBERT was born at Eastbourne, Sussex, on 11th February 1888.

He was educated locally and served an apprenticeship of four years with Messrs. R. H. Munro, machine-tool makers, of South Tottenham.

On its completion in 1909 he studied at the Northampton Institute, London, where he took the three-years' course in Engineering. During this course he was sent to Messrs. Reavell and Co.'s Works at Ipswich, for practical training, and subsequently was engaged on fitting and erecting fir-compressors and steam-engines for the firm.

In November 1914 he enlisted in the Divisional Engineers of the Royal Naval Division, and went out to the Dardanelles in the early part of this year as corporal with the 1st Field Company.

After being slightly wounded in the shoulder by shrapnel, he caught a chill in the very damp trench, which produced the internal trouble from which he died. He was treated at first in a rest camp, and then passed on to the hospital at Cairo, where his death took place on 21st June 1915, at the age of twenty-seven.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1913.


Henry Deakin Liley: 12th July

Graduate 1912.

Pupil, Ruston, Protor & Co, Sheaf Iron Works.

Royal Aircraft Factory, Farnborough, where he carried out valuable investigations in the development of instruments for use on aeroplanes, much of which work has been embodied in actual improvements to aeroplanes at the Front.

Died in an aeroplane accident, Shoreham.

1915 Obituary 

HENRY DEAKIN LILEY was born in London on 11th February 1889.

He was educated at St. Leonardo and at Christ's College, Cambridge.

In 1911 he started his pupilage [sic, pupillage] with Messrs. Ruston, Proctor and Co., Ltd., Lincoln, and on its termination he went to the Royal Aircraft Factory, Farnborough, where he carried out valuable investigations in the development of instruments for use on aeroplanes, much of which work has been embodied in actual improvements to aeroplanes at the Front.

His death took place at Shoreham on 12th July 1915, at the age of twenty-six, as the result of an aeroplane accident.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.

William Douglass James: 25th September

Graduate 1911.

Apprenticed to South Staffordshire Waterworks.

Sapper, Royal Engineers, 1st (Welsh) Field Company.

Killed in action, Loos, France.

Note: war record states died 5th at Gallipoli but a family member has verified that he died in France on the 25th. The confusion is likely to have arisen from a misspelling of his name (one ‘s’ on Douglass and hyphenated surname) on an official record.

1915 Obituary 

WILLIAM DOUGLASS JAMES was born at Yelverton, Devon, on 23rd September 1892.

He was educated at Plymouth College, and in 1909 passed the Intermediate B.Sc. examination in Engineering.

In 1910 he started his apprenticeship with Mr. A. E. Douglass, M.Inst.C.E., of the South Staffordshire Water Works Co., and in October 1911 went to Pembroke College, Cambridge, where he took the Engineering side and in 1914 he left, having obtained a second class in the Mechanical Sciences Tripos.

He was proceeding as pupil to the Engineer-in-Chief of the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board when war was declared, and he as a member of the O.T.C. was given a commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery as special reserve.

He was killed in action in France on 25th September 1915, at the age of twenty-three.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1911.


William Casson: 25th September

Associate Member 1904; Member 1912.

Chief Assistant Engineer, Central London Railway.

Major (Acting Lieutenant Colonel), London Regiment, 7th Battalion.

Awarded: Mentioned in Dispatches and Territorial Decoration (gallantry award).

1915 Obituary 

Captain WILLIAM CASSON was born at Portmadoc on 18th August 1873.

He was educated at the Grammar School, Ruthin, North Wales, and at the City and Guilds Central Technical College, where he obtained the Diploma of Associate of the City and Guilds Institute.

From 1893 to 1895 he was with the Electrical Installation Co., Ltd., after which he was for four years at the Elswick Works of Messrs. Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth and Co., Ltd.

In 1899 he became engaged, together with Mr. H. F. Parshall, on designing, erecting, and testing. He was chiefly concerned with the work of planning and building the London United Tramways and the electrification of the District and Metropolitan Railways.

He joined the staff of the Central London Railway as chief assistant to Mr. Grove in 1907, and remained as chief assistant to Mr. Agnew after the amalgamation of the Central London with the Metropolitan Railway.

Captain Casson was an enthusiastic member of various Volunteer Regiments for twenty-five years. He attained his rank in 1903 in the 7th Battalion, the London Regiment, and at the outbreak of war undertook Imperial Service obligations. On 25th September 1915 he was commanded to lead the British attack at Loos on the extreme right flank, and to seize and hold a dangerous but highly important position. This he accomplished with a skill and courage that was the admiration of all who witnessed it, but he was instantaneously killed by a sniper as he stood on the parapet of the trench rallying his men.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1904, and was transferred to full Membership in 1912.

Herbert Dudley Ellis: 25th September

Graduate 1910.

Engineer Designer, Mather & Platt Ltd.

Enlisted 24th Sep 1914; Discharged to Commission 18 Dec 1914.

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. Prior to this, Royal Marines Divisional Engineers (from 24th Sep 1914).

Wounded/missing/presumed dead, commemorated on Loos Memorial. 

Awarded: 1914 Star (medal trio issued by Royal Garrison Artillery) and British War Medal (notes: no overseas action with Royal Naval Division).

Vivian Gordon: 25th September

Graduate 1906 (deferred until post-grad 1908/9 and then resigned end 1909); Associate Member 1910.

Civilian Director Avonside Engine Co.

Captain, Gordon Highlanders, 8th Battalion.

Killed in action, France.

1916 Obituary

Captain VIVIAN GORDON was born at Buckhurst Hill, Essex, on 18th May 1881.

He was educated at a private school and later at Harrow School, after which he served four years with the Gordon Highlanders and went through the South African War.

In June 1904 he became an articled pupil of Messrs. Willans and Robinson, Rugby, and from March to August 1905 he was also an articled pupil of Mr. D. Earle Marsh, Locomotive Superintendent of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, being employed in the Running Department as a pupil fireman.

In September of that year he entered the City and Guilds of London Central Technical College as a third-year student in the Civil and Mechanical Engineering Course.

He was next for two years as an articled pupil with Sir Douglas Fox and Partners, and then in June 1909 he became a director of The Avonside Engine Co., Ltd., Bristol, being jointly responsible with another director for the management and control of the business of the Company.

On the outbreak of the War he received a Lieutenancy in the 4th Gloucester Regiment, and was afterwards exchanged to the 8th Battalion Gordon Highlanders.

Shortly afterwards he received a Commission as Captain and proceeded to the Front, where he was killed at the Battle of Loos on 25th September 1915, at the age of thirty-four.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1906, and an Associate Member in 1910.

William Crew Tremearne: 25/26th Septemeber

Associate Member 1913.

Assistant Engineer, Singapore Tramway Co.

2nd Lieutenant, Seaforth Highlanders, 8th Battalion.

Killed in action at Loos.

1917 Obituary 

Sec. Lieut. WILLIAM CREW TREMEARNE, Seaforth Highlanders, was born at Leamington Spa on 13th January 1886.

He was educated at Blackheath School, and at the age of seventeen began his apprenticeship at the works of Dick, Kerr and Co., Kilmarnock.

In 1904 he went to Preston and was engaged in erecting electrical machinery for the same firm, subsequently acting as their assistant engineer on tramway construction at Rochester, Borstal, Maidstone, and London.

From 1910 to 1913 he studied at Christ's College, Cambridge, taking the Mechanical Sciences Course, and later on his B.A., and in the latter year he received the appointment of assistant engineer to the Singapore Tramway Co., having charge of the power-house, supervision of the boiler plant and outside track and overhead system.

In 1914 he returned from Singapore, invalided with fever, just before the outbreak of the War, and rejoined the squadron he had previously joined when at Cambridge, namely, King Edward's Horse. Later he obtained a Commission in the Seaforth Highlanders, with whom he went to the Front, and was machine-gun officer to his battalion, He was severely wounded at Loos and again at Hill 70, and was reported missing.

In April 1917 be was presumed to have been killed on 25th September 1915, in his thirtieth year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1913.

Frank Leonard Cunningham: 1st October

Graduate 1907.

Student at UCL.

Trooper, Northumberland Hussars, 1st Battelion.

Died from wounds, France.

1916 Obituary 

FRANK LEONARD CUNNINGHAM was born in Edinburgh on 29th May 1887.

He was educated at a private school in Penzance, at Plymouth and Mannamead College, and at University College, London, where he obtained his Diploma in Mechanical Engineering in 1907.

From February 1908 to August 1910 he served his apprenticeship to Messrs. Sir W. Armstrong, Whitworth and Co., at the Elswick Works, Newcastle-on-Tyne. He was then entrusted by Mr. Alfred Moseley, C.M.G., with a mission to visit Saint Helena and prepare plans and specifications for an engineering plant on that island.

In 1911-12 he was engaged in the drawing-office of Messrs. John I. Thornycroft and Co. at Woolston, Southampton, and in 1912-13 held a post in the drawing-office of Messrs. Vickers, Ltd., at Westminster.

He then entered the service of the Vacuum Oil Co., and was appointed to a post in the Glasgow branch of that company, which he held when the War broke out, the post being kept open for him while on active service.

He joined the Northumberland Hussars at Newcastle in 1909, and on the outbreak of war that regiment was among the first of the Territorial units to offer for foreign service. It was mobilized almost immediately, and proceeded to Belgium with the Seventh Division at the beginning of October 1914. Mr. Cunningham went with his regiment and served through the severe fighting in the neighbourhood of Ypres in October and November 1914. During the great attack on the enemy's positions in the West in September 1915, he was one of four men selected by his officer to carry out a dangerous patrol; all the men's horses were shot, and he and another man were wounded.

He died at the Australian Hospital, Wimereux, near Boulogne, on 1st October 1915, in his twenty-ninth year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1907, and was part author of a Paper on the Endurance of Metals, published in the Proceedings in December 1911.

William Inchley: 19th December

Graduate 1902; Associate Member 1911.

Lecturer/Demonstrator in Engineering, University College Nottingham.

Lieutenant, Duke of Wellington’s West Ridings Regiment, 3rd Battalion and 9th Battalion (Reserve of Officers).

Killed in action, France.

1916 Obituary 

Lieutenant WILLIAM INCHLEY was born at Nottingham on 24th November 1883.

He was educated at All Saints' School, Nottingham, and at University College, Nottingham, where he entered as a Bursar, attended a three years' day course in Engineering, and gained the Associateship of the College in 1901. During his College course he took first place each year, and in 1900 gained first prize, with the Silver Medal in Mechanical Engineering of the City and Guilds of London Institute. Later be graduated as B.Sc. (Engineering) of London University.

From 1902 to 1907 he served an apprenticeship with Messrs. R. Hornsby and Sons, Ltd., of Grantham, where he was engaged on the design, manufacture, testing, and installation of oil-engines and steam-boilers.

In January 1907 he was appointed Demonstrator and Lecturer in Engineering at University College, Nottingham, and occupied this post until his death. He was the author of two text-books, "The Theory of Heat Engines" and "Steam-Boilers," which are regarded as standard works. He was also joint author of "Elementary Applied Mechanics," and wrote several Papers to the Technical Press giving results of original research work.

He became attached to the O.T.C. of Nottingham University College, holding the rank of colour-sergeant, and in November 1913 he received a Commission in the Reserve of Officers. On the outbreak of the War he was posted to the 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment, and was engaged in the training of recruits.

In December 1914 he was ordered to the Front, and passed through severe fighting around Ypres and Hill 60. At the latter place, on 5th May 1915, Lieut. Inchley was "gassed" whilst gallantly rescuing a fellow-officer who had been overpowered by the gas used in great volume by the Germans. After treatment in France and sick-leave in England, he returned to garrison duty on 17th July at Tynemouth Castle, and was ordered back to France in September.

On 19th December 1915 he was killed, at the ago of thirty-two, during an attack by the Germans with high explosive shells and asphyxiating gas.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1902, and was awarded a prize for a Paper on "Steam-Engine and Boiler Trials," read before the Graduates' Association in the Session 1908-9.

He was elected an Associate Member in 1911.


1916

Henry Hans Macfarlane Northcott: 17th January

Associate Member 1910.

Draughtsman and Works Manager, The General Engine & Boiler Co.

Lieutenant, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Eastchurch Naval Flying School (Pilot).

Killed whilst flying in BE2c No.1146, sideslipped & wrecked (Flight Sub-Lieutenant Lorenzo Arthur Thomas Pritchard slightly injured), Isle of Grain, Kent. Pritchard survived the War.

Awarded: 1914 Star, Victory Medal and  British War Medal.

1916 Obituary 

Lieutenant HENRY HANS MACFARLANE NORTHCOTT was born in Surrey on 30th January 1884.

He was educated at Ovingdean, near Brighton, and at St. Edward's School, Oxford, afterwards spending a year in Belgium in order to acquire foreign languages.

From January 1902 to 1905 he served his apprenticeship at the Hatcham Iron Works, New Cross, London, of which his father, Mr. W. H. Northcott, was at that time the senior partner; during this period he attended technical classes at the Goldsmiths' Institute.

After his apprenticeship Mr. Northcott remained with the same firm, engaged in their drawing-office and works, and from 1908-10 he acted as draughtsman and works manager under the managing director.

He was sent on the firm's business to Devonport, Portland, and Portsmouth; at the latter dockyard he spent a considerable time looking after torpedo-compressing machinery made after his father's designs.

At the beginning of the War he joined the Armoured-Car Division of the R.N.A.S. as a motorcyclist, and on 3rd March 1915 sailed with Squadron 4 for the Dardanelles, where he was at once promoted to be Chief Petty Officer. He took part in the landing on the Peninsula on 25th April, when many of his squadron lost their lives.

After seven months of active service he was invalided back to England, but was on duty again at his headquarters within a fortnight of his arrival. In December last he was granted a Commission as Lieutenant, R.N.V.R. for R.N.A.S., and was sent at the New Year to H.M. Seaplane Station, Isle of Grain, Kent.

He was killed when flying, on 17th January 1916, at Milton, Kent, in his thirty-second year.

Lieut. Northcott was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1904, and an Associate Member in 1910.

William Ewart Okey: 21st January

Graduate 1912.

Engineer, Gibson & Battle Ltd.

2nd Lieutenant Connaught Rangers, 1st Battalion.

Killed in action, Mesopotamia.

Awarded: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

1916 Obituary 

Second Lieutenant WILLIAM EWART OKEY was born in Chelsea on 13th February 1888.

He received his early education at Bournemouth School, and from 1905-1909 was apprenticed to Messrs. Ruston, Proctor and Co., Lincoln, remaining with them for two years after the completion of his apprenticeship. During this period be continued his studies at the Lincoln Municipal Technical School.

In 1911 he was selected by the firm to go to Australia as an expert in gas-engines and plant for their Sydney agents, Messrs. Gibson, Battle and Co.

On the outbreak of war in 1914, he returned to England and joined the Army, obtaining a Commission in the lot Connaught Rangers.

He was killed in action in Mesopotamia on 21st January 1916, before he bad completed his twenty-eighth year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.

Anthony Reginald Welsh: 19th February

Associate Member 1911.

Assistant Secretary, Bells Bros.

Lieutenant, Green Howards, Alexandra Princess Of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment), 4th Battalion.

Died in France.

Awarded: Mentioned in Dispatches.

1916 Obituary 

Lieutenant ANTHONY REGINALD WELSH was born at Altrincham on 27th December 1883.

He was educated at Rugby School, of which he was a Scholar and Exhibitioner, from 1896 to 1902, and then proceeded to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took a first class in the Classical Tripos in 1904 and a second class in the Mechanical Sciences Tripos in 1906.

After taking his degree he assisted Professor Bertram Hopkinson in research work on the gas-engine.

In August 1907 he went to Messrs. Mather and Platt's Salford Iron Works and was engaged in the erecting shop and drawing-office, and in 1908-9 was employed by the firm in erecting and running a steam-turbine installation at the Montreal Water Works.

On his return in 1909 he was sent out by the same firm to India in charge of the installation of two gas-engine alternators for the East Indian Railway at Giridih, Bengal.

Owing to severe illness he was invalided home in March 1911, and in the summer of that year he was appointed assistant secretary to Messrs. Bell Bros., Limited, Middlesbrough, where he remained until war broke out, having been Secretary to the Company for the last year.

Lieut. Welsh went out with the 1st 4th Yorkshire Regiment in April 1915, and served continuously at the front from the second battle of Ypres to February last, having been twice wounded slightly, in the head, in May and in June 1915. Severe wounds from a trench mortar bomb proved fatal, and his death took place at Boulogne on 19th February 1916, at the age of thirty-two.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1911.

George Welsby Deakin: 21st March

Associate Member 1903, proposed by Henry Selby Hele-Shaw; Member 1915.

Resident Engineer, Arrols Bridge and Roof Co.

Captain, Royal Engineers, Inland Water Transport.

1916 Obituary 

Captain GEORGE WELSBY DEAKIN, R.E., was born at Birkenhead on 13th September 1877.

He received his scholastic education at Wirral College and Birkenhead School, and his technical education at University College, Liverpool.

In 1894 he began an apprenticeship with Messrs. Beloe and Priest, consulting engineers, Liverpool, and after its completion in 1898 he was engaged as assistant engineer to Mr. W. E. Thornhill on the Chester—Holyhead widening scheme of the London and North Western Railway.

After an illness of some months' duration, he returned to Messrs. Beloe and Priest in 1899, by whom he was engaged as chief assistant, and in the following year he acted for the same firm as resident engineer on the construction of Bebington Sewage Works.

On the completion of this work in the following year he became resident engineer for Arrol's Bridge and Roof Co. on the construction of the transporter bridge over the River Mersey between Widnes and Runcorn.

Subsequently he acted in a similar capacity on the Talgarth District Waterworks, Brecon, the Ashton swing bridge at Bristol, and the Gosport Waterworks aqueduct, etc.

In March 1915 he received a Commission as Captain (temporary) in the Royal Engineers, after training at Longmoor Camp, Aldershot, and from there he was transferred to the War Office, soon after being promoted to Staff Captain. Owing to the arduous nature of the work, which entailed the supervision of vessels constructed for the purpose of filtration and purification of water for the troops abroad, his health broke down, and phthisis developed.

He was removed to Trearddur Bay, near Holyhead, and afterwards to West Kirby, Cheshire, where his death took place on 21st March 1916, in his thirty-ninth year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1903, and was transferred to, full Membership in 1915; he was also an Associate Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and a Member of the Liverpool Engineering Society.

Alexander Charles Arbuthnot Bruce: 24th April

Graduate 1914.

Engineering Student.

Captain, Royal Army Service Corps.

Killed in action at Kantara, Suez Canal.

Awarded: Mentioned in Dispatches.

1916 Obituary 

Captain ALEXANDER CHARLES ARBUTHNOT BRUCE, A.S.C., was born in Edinburgh on 1st September 1889.

He was educated at the Edinburgh Academy from 1897 to 1908, when he began an apprenticeship of five years with Messrs. James Milne and Sons, Ltd., of Abbeyhill, Edinburgh; and during a part of this time he studied at the Heriot-Watt Day College in the winter sessions, and also attended classes at Edinburgh University.

He remained with the firm after the completion of his apprenticeship, but, on the outbreak of the War, having been a keen Territorial since leaving school, and being at the time a Lieutenant in the A.S.C. (T.), he was mobilized and stationed for a year in Scotland, during which time he obtained his Captaincy. The Lowland Mounted Brigade was then sent abroad, and as supply officer with it he served at Cape Helles for some months till the evacuation in January 1916.

He was then ordered to Egypt, and was supply officer at Dueidar, near the Suez Canal, when an overwhelming number of Turks and Arabs attacked the oasis. Owing to a shortage of officers Captain Bruce volunteered for any service, and held an outpost with a few men for some hours.

Reinforcements arrived, but the relieving officer fell, upon which Captain Bruce went out to his rescue, but in doing so was mortally wounded, and died two hours later, on 23rd April 1916, in his twenty-seventh year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1914.

Sir Hay Frederick Donaldson: 5th June

Member 1898; voted to Council 1905; Vice-President 1910; President 1913-1914.

Director-General, Royal Ordnance Factories, Royal Arsenal (became Chief Technical Adviser to the Ministry of Munitions, Sep 1915).

Brigadier General, General Staff, Chief Superintendent Ordnance Factories.

Killed on HMS ''Hampshire'' en-route to Russia with Lord Kitchener.

1916 Obituary 

Sir HAY FREDERICK DONALDSON, K.C.B., the second son of Sir Stuart A. Donaldson, the first Premier of New South Wales, was born at Sydney on 7th June 1856.

He was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, afterwards receiving technical training at the University of Edinburgh.

From 1875 to 1877 he served an apprenticeship at the London and North Western Railway Works, Crewe, under the late Mr. F. W. Webb, and afterwards received further technical training, from 1877 to 1879, at Zurich and at Cambridge.

In 1880 he was employed on Parliamentary work and as engineer in charge of the construction of the Burnley tramways, and in September of the following year was appointed one of the assistant engineers, and shortly after an executive engineer, on the West of India Portuguese Railway and Harbour. During a part of his service here he was in charge of the harbour works at Goa.

In 1887 he returned to England, and was soon appointed by the late Mr. Thomas A. Walker engineer in charge of No. 1 section of the Manchester Ship Canal, which work involved the construction of entrance locks, estuary banks and heavy piling work.

After leaving the Manchester Ship Canal, he was engaged in 1891-2 in private engineering practice, and on 1st January 1893 was appointed Engineer-in-Chief of the London and India Docks Joint Committee, a position which he held until 31st December 1897, when he received the appointment of Deputy Director-General of Ordnance Factories, Woolwich, under the late Sir William Anderson.

Sir William Anderson died in 1898, and during the illness preceding his decease, and after his death, Mr. Donaldson, as he then was, was temporarily in charge of the Royal Ordnance Factories, and in 1899 was appointed Chief Mechanical Engineer.

In 1903, on the retirement of Sir E. Bainbridge, he became Chief Superintendent of the Royal Ordnance Factories. The heavy responsible work, much of it carried on under very trying conditions, greatly taxed his health and strength, added to which were the great demands for guns and munitions for the present War. For his services he received the honour of Companion of the Order of the Bath in 1910, which was followed by that of K.C.B. in 1911.

In September 1915, at the request of Mr. Lloyd George, he temporarily gave up his position at Woolwich in order to act as Technical Adviser at the Ministry of Munitions, and he frequently accompanied the Minister of Munitions on his visits to the chief industrial centres throughout the country; in the autumn he also visited Canada and the United States.

It was as a representative of the Ministry of Munitions that Sir Frederick Donaldson, in company with Mr. Leslie S. Robertson, became a member of the staff of Lord Kitchener on the visit to Russia, whose tragic deaths took place on 5th June 1916 by the sinking of H.M.S. "Hampshire" off the Orkney Islands. Sir Frederick was then nearly sixty years of age. For the purposes of this visit the War Office granted him the relative precedence of a Brigadier-General.

Sir Frederick took an active interest in the work of this Institution, of which he was elected a Member in 1898. He joined the Council in 1905, was a Vice-President in 1910, and occupied the Presidential Chair in 1913-14. During the first year of his Presidency the Institution held its Summer Meeting at Cambridge. This was the first time such a Meeting had been held at one of the older University towns, and, thanks to the admirable arrangements largely organized by the President and his late brother, the Rev. S. A. Donaldson, D.D., then Master of Magdalene and Vice-Chancellor of the University, the Meeting was a great success. At the Summer Meeting in Paris in 1914, about a month before the War broke out, he was at the last moment prevented from attending, owing to urgent matters at Woolwich.

He read a Paper before the Institution in 1903, on "Cutting Angles of Tools," and gave an instructive Lecture to the Graduates in 1909, on "The Interchangeability of Screw-Threads."

He took a most active part in developing the system of examination for Graduates and Associate Members, and made most earnest appeals to the members for establishing on a financial basis the Benevolent Fund of the Institution. He was a Member of Council of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and did excellent work in connection with the Engineering Standards Committee, both as a member of the Main Committee and as Chairman of the Sectional Committee on Screw-Threads and Limit-Gauges.

Leslie Stephen Robinson/Robertson: 5th June

Member 1892, proposed by John Isaac Thornycroft.

Secretary of the Engineering Standards Committee.

General Staff, Director of Production at the Ministry of Munitions.

Killed on HMS ''Hampshire'' en-route to Russia with Lord Kitchener.

Note: birth surname Robinson, he used Robertson.

1916 Obituary 

LESLIE STEPHEN ROBERTSON (formerly ROBINSON) was born at Kotagherry, India, on 4th October 1863, being the youngest son of Sir William R. Robinson, K.C.S.I., sometime Governor of the Presidency of Madras.

He was educated in Germany and at King's College, London, and acquired his scientific training at University College, London, under Sir Alexander B. W. Kennedy (then Professor Kennedy) from 1883 to 1885. He was one of the organizers and the first Secretary of the University College Engineering Society.

He next served two years at the works of Messrs. Denny and Co., of Dumbarton, and from 1887 to 1889 was in the drawing-office of the firm, being later appointed to superintend the Experimental Testing Department.

After some experience at sea as engineer on board the R.M.S. "Jumna," he entered the drawing-office of Messrs. John I. Thornycroft and Co., at Chiswick. For a time he acted as works manager until he was put in charge of a large contract for the French Government at the works of the Societe Anonyme des Forges et Chantiers de la Meditermnee, at Havre. On the completion of this work he visited the United States and Cuba.

In 1892 he commenced private practice as a consulting engineer in Westminster, and six years later was joined by Mr. F. D. Outram, late R.E. Until 1898 he represented Messrs. Normand, of Havre, and had charge of their work in this country. He also acted as Secretary of the first section of the International Railway Congress held at the Imperial Institute, and accompanied the Commission on Light Railways appointed by the Cape Government.

Mr. Robertson contributed two Papers to this Institution, one in 1897 on "Mechanical Propulsion on Canals" and the other in 1898 on "Narrow-Gauge Railways." Amongst other literary work he translated and edited the English edition of M. Bertin's treatise on "Marine Boilers," and delivered a course of lectures on "Water Tube Boilers" at University College, London.

In 1901 he was appointed Secretary of the Engineering Standards Committee, and he was thus brought into contact with every British engineer of eminence.

In July 1915, with the permission of that Committee, lie was appointed assistant to the Director of Production at the Ministry of Munitions, and in this position he was concerned with organizing the production of the metal components of gun-ammunition. His knowledge of the engineering capacity of the workshops of Great Britain was invaluable in the important negotiations leading to the enormous increase in the output of munitions that has been accomplished.

It was in this connection that he became a member of Lord Kitchener's staff on the visit to Russia, and lost his life on 5th June 1916, in his fifty-third year, by the sinking of H.M.S. "Hampshire" off the Orkney Islands. For the purposes of this visit he was granted by the War Office the relative precedence of a Lieut.-Colonel.

Mr. Robertson was elected a Member of this Institution in 1892. He was also a Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, the Institution of Naval Architects, and of other scientific societies. He was chairman and director of several companies, and a Freeman of the Pattenmakers' Company, of which he was Master in 1914.

Alexander Davidson Johnston: 1st July

Graduate 1906 (lapsed 1911); Associate Member 1912.

Engineers, Henry Simons Ltd.

Private, London Regiment, 14th Battalion (London Scottish).

Killed in action.

1916 Obituary 

Private ALEXANDER DAVIDSON JOHNSTON, JUN., London Scottish Regiment, was born at South Shields on 24th May 1883, and was educated at local schools.

In 1898 he began an apprenticeship of six years in the workshops of the Northern Press and Engineering Co., Ltd., South Shields, and in the last two years of which he was in the drawing-office. During his apprenticeship he took the evening course at the Durham College of Science, and later at the Sunderland Technical College.

On the completion of his apprenticeship in 1904 he remained with the firm as draughtsman for a few months.

During the college vacation in 1905 he went in a similar capacity to the works of Messrs. Vickers, Sons and Maxim, Barrow-in-Furness.

In 1906 he gained a Whitworth Exhibition, and returned to the Northern Press and Engineering Co., where he was engaged on the design and development of new machinery for the automatic production of stereo-plates for rotary printing presses.

Two years later he joined the firm of Henry Simon, Ltd., Manchester, and had charge of the experimental department, being responsible for the scientific development of milling machines. Subsequently he became head of the works department, where he showed great ability and promise.

In December 1915 he enlisted in the 1st Battalion, 14th London Scottish, and was drafted to France in the following June.

He was killed at the Battle of the Somme on 1st July 1916, at the age of thirty-three.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1906, and an Associate Member in 1912.

James Samuel Davidson: 1st July

Graduate 1900; Associate Member 1903; Member 1907.

Director & General Manager, Davidson & Co (previously worked in Russia).

Captain, Royal Irish Rifles, 13th Battalion, Machive Gun Corps (Infantry), attd. 108th Company.

Died in France.

1916 Obituary 

Captain JAMES SAMUEL DAVIDSON, Royal Irish Rifles, son of Mr. S. C. Davidson, of the Sirocco Engineering Works, Belfast, was born in Belfast on 9th March 1877.

He was educated at the Royal Academical Institution, and the Campbell College, Belfast, and afterwards spent a year in Paris to acquire the French language.

On 1st January 1895 he commenced his apprenticeship in the Sirocco Engineering Works, and passed through the various departments. Five years later he became works manager, and remained in this capacity until May 1902, during which time he had under his charge the construction of machines for all the various processes in tea manufacture, and also the manufacture of centrifugal fans, propeller fans, drying machines, and other general engineering work.

In June of the same year he became general manager and a director of the firm, which, at the outbreak of the War, was employing about 750 men. While taking a deep interest in the many ramifications of the business, he was more particularly identified with the tea-machinery branch, and personally brought out several improvements, including the Sirocco enclosed type of tilting tray drier, etc.

Soon after the declaration of war the Ulster Division was formed, and Captain Davidson, who had been an active and energetic member of the 1st Batt. North Down Regiment Ulster Volunteer Force, was amongst the first to offer his services, and was given a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the 1st County Down Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles. He became Lieutenant, and shortly afterwards was promoted Captain.

His knowledge of practical engineering was not long in being discovered, and he was appointed to the machine-gun section, subsequently being advanced to the position of Brigade-Captain of the 108th Infantry Brigade, Ulster Division, in which capacity he was commanding the machine guns at the time of his death, which took place, at the age of thirty-nine, in the great attack on 1st July 1916.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1901, an Associate Member in 1903, and was transferred to Membership in 1907.

Bernard Ebenezer Bumpus: 3rd July

Associate Member 1914, proposed by Alexander Siemens.

Engineer, Dick Kerr & Co.

2nd Lieutenant, Northumberland Fusiliers, 12th Battalion.

Killed in action, France.

Awarded: Mentioned in Dispatches by General Sir Douglas Haig, G.C.B., Commander-in-Chief of the British Armies in France, to the Secretary of State for War, for distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty.

1917 Obituary 

Sec. Lieut. BERNARD EBENEZER BUMPUS, Northumberland Fusiliers, was born in London on 9th February 1883.

His education was received at local schools, and at the evening courses of the Finsbury Technical College from 1899 to 1901.

He began his apprenticeship in January 1898 in the shops of Messrs. Johnson and Phillips, Ltd., and two years later went to the works of Siemens Brothers, Ltd.

From 1902 to 1904 he worked in the submarine cable department of the India-rubber, Gutta Percha, and Telegraph Co. of Woolwich.

On the completion of his apprenticeship he was engaged as engineering assistant in the London office of Messrs. Dick, Kerr and Co., Ltd., until 1908, when he was appointed mechanical and electrical engineer to the Bibiani Mines, Ltd.

In the following year, on behalf of Messrs. Dick, Kerr and Co., he made a six months' tour to the West African mines to report on business extensions, and on his return to this country he was employed in the engineering department of the same firm.

In 1914 he went to India to take up a position with the Bombay Electricity Supply and Tramways Co., and early in 1915 volunteered for military service.

Subsequently he received a Commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the Northumberland Fusiliers, and took part in the fighting in France, where he lost his life on 3rd July 1916, in his thirty-fourth year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1914.

Frank Trevor Wilkins: 3rd July

Graduate 1913.

Student at Birmingham University.

2nd Lieutenant, Northumberland Fusiliers, 15th Battalion, Border Regiment, attached to 1st Border regiment.

Killed in action, France.

1916 Obituary 

Sec. Lieut. FRANK TREVOR WILKINS, 13th Northumberland Fusiliers, was born in Birmingham on 8th March 1890.

He was educated at King Edward VI School in his native city, and gained a Foundation Scholarship there in 1900.

On leaving school in 1906 he was apprenticed for five years in the marine-engine works of Messrs. Vickers, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furness, and during the greater part of this time he studied at the Barrow-in- Furness Technical School.

In 1909 he left Barrow to complete his apprenticeship at the University of Birmingham, and having taken his B.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1912, he returned to Barrow for three months' work in the drawing-office.

In October of the same year he obtained a Bowen Research Scholarship in Engineering at the University of Birmingham, where be took a M.Sc. degree in 1914. During the period he was at Birmingham he was a Member of the University Officers' Training Corps, and soon after the outbreak of the war he received a Commission as Second Lieutenant in the 13th Northumberland Fusiliers, proceeding shortly afterwards to Egypt.

In 1916 he was transferred to France, being attached to the 1st Border Regiment, and took part in the great attack on 1st July, when he died from wounds received in action, at the age of twenty-six.

He had prepared a Paper on "Trials of a Diesel Engine," which had been accepted by the Council for reading and discussion at a Meeting. This Paper was the outcome of experiments he had made at the University of Birmingham, and was presented at the Meeting in October by Professor F. W. Burstall, under whose supervision the trials had been made.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1913.

Lyn Arthur Philip Harris: 11th July

Graduate 1914.

Pupil to Mr CT Hurry Riches, Rhymney Railway Locomotive Works.

Captain (Adjutant), Welsh Regiment, 16th Battalion.

Killed in action.

1916 Obituary 

Captain IAN ARTHUR PHILIP HARRIS, Welsh Regiment, was born at Llanishen, Cardiff, on 9th October 1892.

He was educated at Cardiff Intermediate School and Denstone College, Staffordshire, on leaving which in 1910 he became a pupil of Mr. C. T. Hurry Riches, Locomotive Superintendent, Rhymney Railway Works, Caerphilly, near Cardiff. Near the end of his pupilage he passed the Intermediate B.Sc. examination, and after its completion he studied at Cardiff University College for the final examination.

On war breaking out, he joined the Public Schools Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers. On 10th December 1914 he received a Commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 16th (Cardiff City) Battalion of the Welsh Regiment, was promoted to be Lieutenant on 1st June 1915, and Captain on 4th December 1915, on which day he went out with his regiment to France. On 30th March 1916 he also became Adjutant.

He was killed at the taking of Mametz Wood, France, on 11th July 1916, in his twenty-fourth year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1913.

William Clayton Harvey: 14th July

Associate Member 1911.

Consulting Engineer to the Tasmanian Government.

Lieutenant, Kings Royal Rifle Corps, 20th Battalion.

Killed in action in France.

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. WILLIAM CLAYTON HARVEY, King's Royal Rifles, was born at Ventnor, Isle of Wight, on 9th December 1879.

His early education having been received at schools in Hobart, Tasmania, at the age of eighteen he returned to England to study at the Crystal Palace School of Engineering, after which he attended classes at King's College, London.

In 1902 he began his engineering training under Mr. W. G. Walker, of Westminster, and in the following year became a draughtsman in the London Office of Messrs. Dorman, Long and Co.

Six years later he was appointed consulting engineer in London to the Government of Tasmania, and was holding this post up to the time of his receiving a Commission in the King's Royal Rifles.

He was killed in action in France on 14th July 1916, in his thirty-seventh year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1911.

Thomas Booth Keyms: 19th July

Member 1913.

Assistant Locomotive Superintendent, Great Western of Brazil Railway.

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Field, Artillery, "B" Battery 84th Brigade.

Killed in action, France.

1916 Obituary 

Sec. Lieut. Thomas BOOTH KEYMS, Royal Field Artillery, was born at Cork on 26th October 1879.

He received his early education at Cork Model School and at Queen Street Collegiate Schools, and in 1896 matriculated at the Royal University of Ireland. His technical instruction was received at the Schools of Science and Art, Cork.

He began his apprenticeship in 1897, at Messrs. Dubs and Co., Queen's Park Works, Glasgow, where he also acquired two years' drawing office practice. He obtained further experience on the Caledonian Railway at their running sheds at Polmadie.

On leaving Messrs. Dubs and Co., he was for a time assistant to Messrs. Strain and Robertson, Consulting Engineers, Glasgow, and from 1905 to 1908 he was in charge of locomotive and rolling stock work.

He left for Brazil in the latter year, where he took up the duties of Assistant Locomotive Engineer in charge of the Southern District of the Great Western Railway of Brazil.

He joined the Colours during the European War, receiving a Commission as Second Lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery Special Reserve. While serving his apprenticeship in Glasgow he was a member of the 1st Lanark Volunteers, and while in Brazil, was a member of the Legion of Frontiersmen.

His death took place in action on 19th July 1916, in his thirty-seventh year, as a result of a shell bursting at his feet in the course of artillery action where, from the report of his brother officers, he showed conspicuous bravery in carrying out his duty.

He was elected a Member of this Institution in 1913.

Robert Sergius Robertson: 20th July

Graduate 1914.

Apprenticed to Blackadder Bros.

2nd Lieutenant, Kings Own Scottish Borders, 1st Battalion, attached to 3rd Battalion.

Died of wounds.

1917 Obituary 

Sec. Lieut. ROBERT SERGIUS ROBERTSON, lst King's Own Scottish Borderers, was born at Ponce, Porto Rico, West Indies, on 4th September 1893.

His primary education was received at Albert Road Academy, Pollokshields, Glasgow, and afterwards at Allan Glen's School. Leaving there he took the Diploma Course at the Royal Technical College, Glasgow, gaining the Associateship. During the last year of his studies, he was at the University of Glasgow and took his B.Sc. degree in Engineering.

He received his practical engineering training partly with Messrs. Blackadder Bros., Falkirk, and Messrs. Gauldie and Gillespie, of Kinning Park, Glasgow.

From the O.T.C. of his University he received his Commission in March 1915, being attached to the 1st King's Own Scottish Borderers, and was with his battalion in Gallipoli from the beginning of October 1915 until the evacuation of our forces.

He was transferred with his unit to France, and was wounded at Beaumont Hamel on 8th July 1916, his death taking place at Rouen on 20th July, in his twenty-third year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1914.

Arthur Poynting: 25th July

Associate Member 1912.

Assistant Engineer, Port of London Authority.

Lieutenant, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 6th Battalion, Machine Gun Corps, attached to 143rd Brigade.

1916 Obituary 

Lieut. ARTHUR POYNTING, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was born at Edgbaston, Birmingham, on 31st December 1882, being the only son of the late Professor Poynting, F.R.S.

His early education was received at King Edward's High School, Birmingham, and, after a four-years' course at the University of Birmingham, he graduated as Bachelor of Science, subsequently becoming M.Sc.

On leaving the University in 1905 he entered the service of the Midland Railway Co., Derby, as assistant engineer in the New Works Dept., and in the following year was transferred to the office of the resident engineer, Heysham Harbour, where he was engaged on the construction of the harbour, buildings, and permanent way.

In 1910 he became Assistant Engineer at the London and St. Katharine Docks, and a year later was transferred to the head office of the Port of London Authority as assistant to the Chief Engineer. He also acted as resident engineer on the construction of that Authority's cold store in Charterhouse Street, London.

He joined the Army two days after war broke out, and obtained a Commission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, with which regiment he had been associated while a student at the University.

He was afterwards attached to the Machine Gun Corps, and was killed in action near Pozitres, France, on 25th July 1916, in his thirty-fourth year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1913.

Lionel Egerton Vyall: 3rd September

Graduate 1911.

Pupil, Rhymey Railway Co.

Corporal, Canadian Army, 2nd Canadian Division Signal Company.

Died in a motor cycle accident, France.

1917 Obituary 

Corporal LIONEL EGERTON VYALL, Canadian Division, was born at Chawant, Punjab, on 11th March 1889.

After attending a preparatory school he went to Cheltenham College for three years, and finally to the Central Technical College, South Kensington, where he completed his three years' course in 1909, obtaining the College Diploma and B.Sc. (Eng.) degree, University of London, with honours.

He then underwent his practical training for three years as a pupil at the locomotive works of the Rhymney Railway Co., Caerphilly.

In 1911 he was selected for an assistant engineer's appointment in the Public Works Department of India, but was unfortunately disqualified owing to defective eyesight, and then became an assistant inspector at Glasgow on Sir Alexander Renders staff, which he held for a year.

In April 1913 he went to Canada, and worked for short periods in the Canadian Pacific Railway workshops, the Dominion Bridge Engineering Co., and other firms in Montreal.

When the War broke out he enlisted as a dispatch rider in the 2nd Signal Company, 2nd Canadian Division, and underwent his training at Ottawa, and subsequently at Shorncliffe. In September 1915 he went with his Division to France, where he served for a year.

On 3rd September 1916, whilst carrying dispatches between St. Omer and St. Martin, he met with a fatal motor-cycle accident at night. He was in his twenty-eighth year.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1911.

John Howarth: 10th September

Graduate 1909; Associate Member 1914.

Engineering Assistant, James Diggle & Sons.

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Engineers,  1st West Riding Field Company.

Died of wounds.

1916 Obituary 

Sec. Lieut. JOHN HOWARTH, Royal Engineers, was born at Rochdale on 10th August 1889.

After receiving his elementary education at Cronkeyshaw School, Rochdale, he began an apprenticeship at the age of fourteen at the Sun Ironworks, Heywood, and four years later he became an articled pupil to Messrs. J. Diggle and Son, civil engineers, of Westminster and Heywood.

On the completion of his apprenticeship in 1910, he remained as engineering assistant to the same firm, being engaged on the design and installation of various pumping and power plants for water and sewage works, also bridges and civil engineering plant. For a time he acted as resident engineer at the Salford Sewage Works.

In September 1914 be joined the Army as sapper in the Royal Engineers, and rapidly became Quartermaster-Sergeant. Ultimately he was offered a Commission as Second Lieutenant in the Royal Engineers, and went to Egypt in December 1915. A few months latter he was ordered to France, where he was wounded by shrapnel. After being six weeks in hospital at Boulogne, he was brought over to the Military Hospital at Epsom, where he died on 10th September 1916, at the age of twenty-seven.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1909, and an Associate Member in 1914.

Hugh Gordon Stephens: 12th September

Graduate 1914.

Pupil, North Staffordshire Railway.

Private, Middlesex Regiment.

Killed in action at Ypres.

1917 Obituary

Private HUGH GORDON STEPHENS, 16th Middlesex Regiment, was born in Madras on 8th May 1894.

His scholastic education was received in Bangalore, S. India, and at the age of nineteen he went to England to commence a pupilage in the locomotive works of the North Staffordshire Railway.

On the completion of his pupilage, he was preparing to enter the Engineering Faculty of University College, London, but gave up all the chances of a University and professional career, and joined the 16th Middlesex Regiment in June 1915.

He went to France in September 1915, and took his part in the fighting on the Somme on 1st July 1916.

He was killed at Ypres, on the 12th September 1916, at the age of twenty-two.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1914.

Charles Lambert Druitt: 13th October

Graduate 1912.

Assistant, South Eastern and Chatham Railway.

Lieutenant, Seaforth Highlanders, 9th Battalion.

Died in France.

Awarded: Mentioned in Dispatches.

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. CHARLES LAMBERT DRUITT, Seaforth Highlanders, was born at Christchurch, Hants, on 14th October 1888.

After attending a preparatory school at Southbourne, he went to King's School, Canterbury, and on leaving there in 1907 he took the three years' course at the Central Technical College, South Kensington, obtaining the College Diploma.

In 1910 he worked for one year in the locomotive shops of the Barry Railway Co., South Wales, and then was articled for three years to Mr. P. C. Tempest, the chief engineer of the South Eastern and Chatham Railway, and subsequently was engaged as assistant district engineer on that line.

In 1915 he joined the 9th Seaforth Highlanders (Pioneers) as 2nd Lieutenant, and was engaged in the Battle of the Somme from its commencement.

In August 1916 he was promoted to be full Lieutenant, and was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's dispatch of 13th November.

He was killed near Eaucourt l'Abbaye on 13th October 1916, at the age of twenty-eight.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.

William Arthur Reynolds: 29th October

Graduate 1912.

Engineering Student at the Municipal Technical Institute, West Ham.

Lance Corporal, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 2nd/8th Battalion, "B" Company.

Died of wounds.

1917 Obituary 

Lance-Corporal WILLIAM ARTHUR REYNOLDS, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was born in London on 24th November 1892.

He was educated at schools in West Ham, and gained a scholarship at West Ham Technical Institute, graduating B.Sc. (Eng.), University of London, in 1913.

When war broke out be was an apprentice at Messrs. Thornycroft's Shipbuilding Works at Southampton, and was a member of the 5th Hants Territorials.

Early in 1916 be was transferred to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and went to France in May.

On 28th October 1916 he was wounded by an aerial torpedo and died the following day, in his twenty-fourth year. Shortly before his death he was granted a Commission in the Royal Engineers, but unfortunately he did not live to hear of his success.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.

Charles Kennedy: 16th November

Associate Member 1911.

Locomotive Carriage and Wagon Superintendent, Great Western of Brazil Railway.

Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery, "D" Battery 113th Brigade.

Died of wounds sustained in France. 

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. CHARLES KENNEDY, R.F.A., was born at Sanquhar, Dumfriesshire, on 30th November 1880.

He was educated at the Ayr Academy and the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College, and served an apprenticeship of five years with Messrs. Dubs and Co., Glasgow Locomotive Works.

On its completion in 1903 he worked for a year with the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway, and then became district locomotive superintendent of the Great Western of Brazil Railway.

From 1908 to 1910 he was assistant locomotive superintendent, and in 1911 he was appointed locomotive, carriage, and wagon superintendent of the same railway. When war broke out he was home on leave and had taken his passage to return to Brazil, but joined the London Scottish, subsequently receiving a Commission in the Royal Field Artillery.

He was wounded on the Somme on 14th November 1916, and died two days later, in his thirty-sixth year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1911, and was transferred to Membership in 1915.

Allen William Corfe: 26th November

Graduate 1912.

Apprenticed to Cammell, Laird & Co.

Company Serjeant Major, Cheshire Regiment, 6th Battalion.

Died of wounds.

1917 Obituary 

Co. Sergeant-Major ALLAN WILLIAM CORFE was born at Liscard, Cheshire, on 23rd November 1891.

His early education was received at local schools, after which he attended the Liscard School of Art and the Central Technical School, Liverpool, where he passed various Board of Education examinations.

In June 1906 he was apprenticed to Messrs. T. Ollis and Co., of Liverpool, printing machine manufacturers, and in February 1908 he continued his apprenticeship at the ship-repairing works of Messrs. H. and C. Grayson, Birkenhead, where he remained two years, and at the shipbuilding works of Messrs. Cammell, Laird and Co., Birkenhead, subsequently spending six months in the drawing office.

On the completion of his apprenticeship he became draughtsman at the works of Messrs. Mirrlees, Bickerton and Day, Stockport, and was in their employment on the outbreak of the War.

Previously he had entered the Cheshire Territorial Regiment as a private, and successively passed through every stage in the non-commissioned ranks until he was made Company Sergeant-Major.

He was recommended by his Commanding Officer for a Commission shortly before his death, which resulted from wounds received in France, on 26th November 1916, at the age of twenty-five.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.

Gilbert Sudbury Hall: 30th Novemeber

Graduate 1910.

Apprenticed to J Carter, Sons & Co.

2nd Lieutenant Royal Flying Corps, 18th Squadron.

Aviators certificate granted 16th Jan 1916.

Died of wounds sustained over France.

1917 Obituary 

Sec. Lieut. GILBERT SUDBURY HALL, R.F.C., was born at Matlock on 28th December 1890, and was educated at Mill Hill School.

In October 1908, he began an apprenticeship in the engineering works of J. Carter Sons and Co., Ltd., Salford, and during his apprenticeship he took a course at the Manchester School of Technology.

In November 1915, he joined the Royal Flying Corps, and after training went to the Front in May 1916. While on patrol work, his machine was shot down, the observer being killed at once. Lieut. Hall died of his wounds ten days later, 30th November 1916, in the enemy hospital at Cambrai, in his twenty-sixth year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1910.

Archibald Samuel de St Legier: 21st December

Associate Member 1907.

Engineer Lieutenant, Royal Navy, HMS ''Warrior''.

Engineer Lieutenant Commander, HMS ''Negro''.

Drowned on service.

1917 Obituary 

Engineer Lieut.-Commander ARCHIBALD SAMUEL DE ST. LEGIER, R.N., was born at Loughborough on 6th November 1882.

He was educated at Loughborough Grammar School and at St. Paul's School, West Kensington. Having taken a special course of instruction at Portsmouth, he passed 8th out of 200 candidates in the examination for Cadets for the Royal Naval Engineering College at Devonport, which be entered in 1899.

On the completion there of his five years' term in 1904, be became Engineer Sub-Lieutenant on H.M.S. "Majestic," and afterwards served on the "Aboukir," "Bedford," "Warrior," and "Falmouth."

In 1907 he was promoted to Engineer Lieutenant, and in 1915 to Engineer Lieut.-Commander.

He was on H.M.S. "Bedford " when she was wrecked on the coast of Japan, and on H.M.S. "Falmouth " at the Battle of Heligoland, when she sank the German Cruiser "Mainz." His last appointment was to the Destroyer "Negro," which was commissioned in May 1916. This ship was run into and sunk by another Destroyer on 21st December 1916, all the officers and 49 men being lost. He was thus thirty-four years of age.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1907.

Edward Newton: 27th September

IMechE Staff.

Private, London Regiment, Coldstream Guards, 3rd Battalion.

Died from wounds, France.

1917

 

Harold Brindley Robb: 2nd January

Graduate 1912.

Student.

Lieutenant, Royal Army Service Corps.

Awarded: Victory Medal, British War Medal and Mentioned in Dispatches.

Died from illness.

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. HAROLD BRINDLEY ROBB, A.S.C. (M.T.), was born in London on 25th March 1893.

He received his early education at schools in Balham and Clapham and at the Battersea Polytechnic, after which he took a three-years' course at the City and Guilds Technical College, Finsbury, gaining diplomas in civil and mechanical engineering.

On the completion of his College course he entered the firm of Messrs. H. Young and Co., constructional engineers, of Nine Elms, where he was engaged on the design of various kinds of steel structures, until the outbreak of the War, when he joined the London University O.T.C., from which he was commissioned to the Royal Fusiliers, and was later transferred to the Motor Transport Section of the Army Service Corps. In this position he was engaged in designing and erecting several small buildings for his Company at the Front, and in the construction of roads. Later he became an anti-gas instructor and Officer in charge of Section for the felling of trees for the supply of wood and fuel. He was mentioned in Dispatches on 5th January 1917 by Sir Douglas Haig for distinguished service during the fighting on the Somme.

His death took place at the Millbank Hospital from illness contracted abroad, on 2nd January 1917, in his twenty-fourth year.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.


Beresford Frank Parsons: 23rd January

Graduate 1913.

Pupil Engineer, City Gas Works, Birmingham.

Second Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps.

Killed in a flying accident.

1917 Obituary 

Sec. Lieut. BERESFORD FRANK PARSONS, R.F.C., was born in Birmingham on 18th March 1892.

He received his early education at Solihull Grammar School and at King Edward's High School, Birmingham.

In 1908 he began an apprenticeship of four years at the Birmingham Corporation Gas Works, and during the same period studied at the Birmingham Technical School.

On the completion of his term he remained at the Gasworks as assistant engineer.

In 1914 he joined the 6th Warwicks Territorials, and in the following March went to France. After 13 or 14 months he came home for his Commission, which he obtained in October 1916, and was attached to the Royal Flying Corps.

His death took place from an accident while flying, on 23rd January 1917, in his twenty-fifth year.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1913.

John Arthur Crichton: 6th February

Graduate 1907 (lapsed 1911); Associate Member 1913.

Mechanical Engineer, JH Biles & Co.

Major (Acting Lieutenant Colonel), Royal Hampshire Regiment, 6th Battalion, Royal Engineers, attached to Inland Water Transport.

Died in Mesopotamia.

1917 Obituary 

Major JOHN ARTHUR CRICHTON, R.E., was born at Netley Abbey, Hants, on 19th August 1883, being youngest son of Colonel The Hon. Sir Harry Crichton, A.D.C.

He was educated at Radley College, Berkshire, and at University College, London, after which he served a three years' apprenticeship with Messrs. J. I. Thornycroft and Co., of Chiswick. After going through the various shops and drawing office, he joined the service of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. in 1909 as sea-going engineer, and subsequently obtained the chief engineer's certificate of the Board of Trade.

When war was declared he proceeded to India with the 1/5th Battalion Hampshire Regiment, in which he was serving as a Captain. He was promoted to Major in 1915, and early in 1916 the Indian Government appointed him to undertake the equipment of the transport for the inland water service, being officially attached to the Royal Engineers. He had very responsible work to do, being in charge of the construction and re-erection of river vessels, and by his energy, tact, and thorough technical knowledge, he was able to expedite the delivery of vessels and to improve the carrying capacity of the river fleet in Mesopotamia.

His death took place in that country on 6th February 1917, in his thirty- fourth year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1913.

Leslie Henry Worssam: 8th February

Graduate 1903; Associate Member 1911.

Head Draughtsman, Worssam & Son.

Private, Honourable Artillery Company, 1st Battalion.

Killed in action, France.

1917 Obituary 

Private LESLIE HENRY WORSSAM, H.A.C., was born in London, on 3rd February 1885.

He was educated at Aldenham School, and University College, London, and subsequently served a five years' apprenticeship from 1902 to 1907 with his father's firm, Messrs. G. J. Worssam and Son, brewery engineers and coppersmiths, London. On its completion he entered the drawing office and took charge of outdoor work, subsequently becoming head draughtsman.

On the conversion of the firm into a limited liability company in 1912, he became one of the directors under his father's chairmanship.

He went to France with the Hon. Artillery Company in December 1914, was wounded at Hooge on 16th June 1915, and killed in action at Hamel on 8th February 1917, at the age of thirty-two.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1903, and an Associate Member in 1911.

Reginald Henry Birbeck Handcock: 17th February

Associate Member 1910.

Assistant Engineer, Western Electic Co.

Lieutenant, Army Ordnance Corps.

Drowned in the Somme.

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. REGINALD HENRY BIRBECK HANDCOCK, A.O.D., was born at Stoke-on-Trent on 10th January 1880, and was educated at schools at Stoke-on-Trent, and at Newcastle-under-Lyme.

He began his apprenticeship in 1899 in the works of the North Staffordshire Railway Co., Stoke-on-Trent, and completed it with Messrs. James Simpson and Co., Ltd., Engineers, London.

In October 1902 he became Assistant Engineer at Messrs. Drake and Gorham, Ltd., Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Manchester, and in 1904 he was appointed chief draughtsman with Messrs. P. Willis, Sons and Co., Engineers, of Kingston-on-Thames.

From 1906, he was with the Western Electric Co., North Woolwich, as Assistant Engineer, and was personally responsible for the design and supervision of electric plant on various installations until he joined H.M. Forces. He received his Commission as First Lieut., in the Army Ordnance Department in November 1915, and was appointed an Inspector of Ordnance Machinery.

He left England for France in April 1916, and was in charge of a mobile light workshop until his death.

He was drowned in the Somme on the 17th February 1917, at the age of thirty-seven.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1910.

Royston Swire Griffiths: 17th March

Graduate 1906; Associate Member 1913.

Sales Engineer, British Westinghouse Co.

Enlisted 24/9/14; Discharged to Commission 12/1/15; To France as Temporary Lieutenant 21/7/16-17/3/17. Appointed Lance Corporal 19/11/14; No active service with Royal Naval Division.

Major, Acting Major, Acting Lieutenant Colonel, Lance Corporal, Royal Marines (Royal Naval Divisional Engineers), 123rd Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery.

1917 Obituary 

Major ROYSTON SWIRE GRIFFITHS, R.G.A., was born at Burry Port, Carmarthenshire, on 8th November 1885.

He was educated privately and at Llanelly County School, and passed the Matriculation Examination of the University of London.

At the age of eighteen he went to an engineering works in Bonn, Germany, for twelve months, and on his return he was apprenticed to the British Westinghouse Co., of Manchester.

On the completion of his apprenticeship three years later, in 1907, he remained with the Company, and was engaged on the erection staff of the gas-engine department in various parts of the country and abroad.

Among the various devices he evolved may be mentioned a method for making more effective the sealing in of metallic wires or tubes to glass vessels, and to prevent surface leakage when used as electrical conductors. He also invented an improved hand-grenade.

Soon after the outbreak of the War he joined the Naval Division of the Royal Engineers, and in January 1915 he obtained his Commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery.

He was on active service in France when he succumbed to a sudden illness on 17th March 1917, at the age of thirty-one, having attained the rank of Major.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1906, and an Associate Member in 1913.

Guy Strafford Thorne: 18th March

Associate Member 1914.

Engineer in Chief & Manager, Kwang Tung Elec Supply Co, China.

Captain, Royal Flying Corps, 13th Squadron.

Aviator's certificate 1 Apr 1916.

Died of wounds, France.

Arthur Scott Buckton: 9th April

Graduate 1910; Associate Member 1916.

Land Surveyor, Canada.

Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery, 100th Siege Battery.

Died in France.

1917 Obituary 

Captain ARTHUR SCOTT BUCKTON, R.G.A., B.Sc. (Loud.), was born at Plaistow, Essex, on 29th October 1888.

He was educated at the East London School and College, where he became a Whitworth Exhibitioner in 1910. Four years previously he began an apprenticeship at the works of the Port of London Authority, and on its completion in 1910 he remained for one year as assistant engineer.

He then went to Canada and was engaged as assistant engineer in the Public Works Department at Edmonton, Alberta, subsequently becoming a Dominion Land Surveyor in 1914.

On the outbreak of War he returned home and rejoined the London University O.T.C., and received a Commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery in January 1915, serving in Egypt and in France. He was promoted to Captain in January 1917.

His death took place in action at Arras on 9th April 1917, in his twenty-ninth year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1910, and an Associate Member in 1916.

Robert Hugh Walker: 9th April

Graduate 1898; Associate Member 1901.

Manager, Neuchatel Asphalt Co, Switzerland.

Lieutenant, Seaforth Highlanders, 9th Battalion.

Died in France.

Awarded: Mentioned in Dispatches.

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. ROBERT HUGH WALKER, Seaforth Highlanders, was born at Crowborough on 25th January 1875.

He was educated at Barham House, St. Leonards-on-Sea, and at Shrewsbury School.

In October 1891 he began an apprenticeship of five years at the works of Messrs. Marshall, Sons and Co., Gainsborough, and on its completion he went to various firms to gain experience, notably the Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., Glasgow, and Messrs. T. Middleton and Co., of Southwark, London, for whom he was employed for eighteen months at Rouen, in charge of the manufacture of special machinery for making inlaid linoleum.

In 1901 he was appointed manager of the Neuchatel Asphalte Co., Ltd., Travers, Neuchatel, Switzerland, and became an expert in the work of asphalte milling and its use in paving. He subsequently served the company in Australia and Athens.

Soon after the outbreak of the War he came home and offered his services to the War Office, being gazetted in January 1915 to the Seaforth Highlanders. He was mentioned in dispatches after the operations on the Somme, where he was slightly wounded.

While leading his Company in an attack on a village near Arras, he was killed on 9th April 1917, at the age of forty-two.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1898, and an Associate Member in 1901.

Charles Lysaght Bruce Hewson: 12th April

Associate Member 1908; Member 1911.

District Locomotive Superintendent of the Olokemeji-Jebba Division, Government Railways of Southern Nigeria.

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers.

Died on service, at sea.

Awarded: Mentioned in Dispatches.

1918 Obituary 

Lieutenant CHARLES LYSAGHT BRUCE HEWSON, R.E., second son of the late George Hewson, D.L., of Ennismore, Co. Kerry, was born on 1st September 1881.

He was educated at schools at Clifton and Tipperary, and in July 1899 he began an apprenticeship at the locomotive shops of the London and North Western Railway, Crewe. During that period he also studied at the Crewe Mechanics' Institute.

On leaving in 1903 he went as assistant in the Running Superintendent's Office of the Great Southern and Western Railway, Ireland, but had to leave a few months later owing to serious illness.

In May 1905 he went to Egypt, being appointed assistant and district locomotive superintendent on the Sudan Railways during the construction of the Nile to Red Sea Railway. On the completion of this railway in September 1907 he was appointed junior assistant locomotive superintendent to the Government Railways of Southern Nigeria, and in July 1910 he took charge of the locomotive, carriage and wagon shops at Lagos during the absence of the works manager. Subsequently he became District Locomotive Superintendent of the Olokemeji-Jebba Division.

In 1914, shortly after the commencement of the Cameroons Campaign, he was commissioned Lieutenant, and attached to the Royal Engineers, and the railway contingent under his command did excellent work in repairing the railways and locomotives, being mentioned by General Cunliffe in his dispatches.

He was invalided from Nigeria, after two months in hospital, from fever contracted in the German Cameroons, and died on the voyage home on 12th April 1917, in his thirty-sixth year.

He became an Associate Member of this Institution in 1908, and a Member in 1911.

Douglas Eckley Langdon: 23rd April

Graduate 1908; Associate Member 1911.

Drawing Office, Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway.

Captain, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, 1st Battalion.

Killed in action.

Spanish national.

1917 Obituary 

Captain DOUGLAS ECKLEY LANGDON, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, second son of William Langdon, of Launceston, was born at Huelva, Spain, on 3rd April 1884.

He was educated at Ipswich Grammar School, and in April 1900 began an apprenticeship at the works of Messrs. Saxby and Farmer, Chippenham.

Three years later he entered the service of the Great Western Railway as improver for four years in their locomotive works at Newton Abbot, and passed through the fitting, erecting, machine shops, and drawing office. During the period of his apprenticeship and subsequently, he attended Technical schools at Bath, Chippenham, and Newton Abbot.

In September 1907 he entered the service of the Buenos Aires and Pacific Railway in the drawing office at Junin, Argentina, and in the following February he was sent as assistant shed foreman to Villa Mercedes.

Two years later he became assistant to the Divisional Locomotive Superintendent at Justo Dorset until the following January, when he was promoted to take charge of the Company's running-shed at Beazley.

On the outbreak of War in August 1914 he immediately applied for and obtained leave to go home, and on the day following his arrival in London he enlisted in A Company of the Public Schools and Universities Corps then just forming (afterwards 18th Batt. London Royal Fusiliers). He was offered a Commission in the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry in May 1915, and in September 1916 he was promoted Acting Captain abroad. In March of the same year he was sent out at night with a small party to repair the wire in front of their trenches, and was hit below the knee by a rifle bullet.

After being in the Red Cross Hospital at Rouen for eight weeks he returned to his battalion at the front.

On the night of the 22nd-23rd April 1917 he took his Company into action and was killed instantly while clearing the enemy out of some ruined houses. In this action all the officers of the Company were killed or wounded. He was thirty-three years of age.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1908, and an Associate Member in 1911.

Robert George Frederick Maunsell: 4th May

Graduate 1913.

Assistant Locomotive Foreman of Running Shed, London and South Western Railway Co.

Captain, Royal Engineers, Hants Fortress Company.

Drowned in the Mediterranean.

Awarded: Victory Medal and British War Medal.

1917 Obituary 

Captain ROBERT GEORGE FREDERICK MAUNSELL, R.E. (T.), was born at Bournemouth on 25th March 1891.

He was educated at Sherborne School, and in his seventeenth year became a pupil of the late Mr. Dugald Drummond, locomotive superintendent of the London and South Western Railway Co., with whom he remained nearly five years.

He joined 1/7th Hants Royal Engineers as 2nd Lieut., was promoted Lieutenant in August 1914, and, shortly after the War began, volunteered.

In 1915 he was promoted Temp. Captain on embarking with his Company for France. He then proceeded to Egypt, and finally to Saloniea, where be served for upwards of a year, when he came home on leave.

When returning to Salonica the vessel on which he was sailing, H.M. Transport "Transylvania," was torpedoed in the Mediterranean on 4th May 1917. Captain Maunsell, having refused to go on board the relief ship, as he would be taking the place of a soldier, went down with the ship. He was twenty-six years of age.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1913.

Percy Towns Armstrong: 26th May

Associate Member 1912.

Engineer, Radiant Heating.

Lieutenan, Royal Naval Air Service, King's North Naval Air Station, HMS ''Queen Empress''.

Accidentally killed in gas plant explosion.

Note: IMechE Journal states that he died in an aeroplane accident, war record states explosion as does our obituary.

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. PERCY TOWNS ARMSTRONG, R.N.V.R., R.N.A.S., was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne on 21st December 1885.

He was educated at Newcastle-on-Tyne and was a pupil of the Engineer to the Walker and Wallsend Union Gas Co.

From 1901 to 1906 he served an apprenticeship with Messrs. John Abbot and Co., Ltd., Gateshead, and during the same period he attended evening classes at the Armstrong College.

On the completion of his apprenticeship he became an assistant engineer at the Walker and Wallsend Union Gas Works, being engaged on the construction of the Howden Lane Works, until 1908, when he took a two-years' course in Gas Engineering at the University of Leeds.

On taking his diploma in 1910 he was appointed engineer to Radiant Heating, Ltd., of Leeds, and held this post until 1913, when he joined the engineering staff of Messrs. R. and J. Dempster, Ltd., of Manchester. In this capacity he was engaged on the design, erection, and working of gas-producer plant, with by-product recovery plant, at the Birmingham Battery and Metal Co., Ltd.

In 1915 he became resident engineer to the Barnsley Smokeless Fuel Co., Ltd., on the construction of their works near Barnsley, and in August 1916 he was appointed Lieutenant R.N.V.R. and attached to the R.N.A.S. in charge of hydrogen plant at Kingsworth Royal Naval Air Station, where he was accidentally killed by an explosion of a gas-holder containing hydrogen gas, on 26th May 1917, at the age of thirty-one.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1912.

Michael William Barstow: 3rd June

Graduate 1915.

Engineering Student, Municipal Technical College, Brighton.

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery.

Died in France.

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. MICHAEL WILLIAM BARSTOW, R.G.A., was born at Canterbury on 12th March 1897.

He was educated at Littlehampton, at Dover College from 1911-13, and at the Municipal Technical College, Brighton, taking the three years' Course.

In the autumn of 1915 he entered the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and passed out at the top of the list over 100 candidates; he received his Commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery in August 1916, when he joined the 203rd Siege Battery, then forming, as second in command, and was Acting Captain from 21st December.

He was killed on 3rd June 1917, at the age of twenty, while in charge of the guns, by the only German shell which had fallen on the Battery.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1915.

Edgar Bradley Barrett: 11th July

Associate Member 1916.

Assistant Electrical Engineers, Power Station, Karteri, India.

Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers.

Killed in action.

Note: date of death below is given as Jan 1918, the date quote in this list is from his war record.

1919 Obituary 

Lieut. EDGAR BRADLEY BARRETT, ME., was born at South Shields on 23rd February 1884.

After attending local schools, he studied at the Armstrong College, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and served an apprenticeship of over five years with Messrs. Ernest Scott and Mountain, Ltd., of the same city. On the completion of his term he remained with the firm as charge engineer and outside erector.

In 1911 he went to South America as assistant mechanical engineer to the Frontino and Bolivia Gold Mining Co., Ltd., in the Republic of Colombia, but was invalided home with malaria in the following year, when he joined the staff of the Newcastle-on-Tyne Electric Supply Co., Ltd., for a short period.

In 1913 he was appointed assistant electrical engineer, under the Government of India, at the hydro-electric power station at Kateri, which supplied power to the cordite factory at Aruvan-Kadu, S. India.

On the completion of his agreement in 1917, he returned to England to join the Royal Engineers (Electric Section), in which Corps he was given a Commission.

His death took place in January 1918, soon after his arrival in France, in his thirty- fourth year.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1916.

Edward Vivian Morgan Crofton: 14th July

Graduate 1912.

Assistant, Dolby & Williamson Consulting Engineers.

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers, 61st Filed Company.

Killed in action, France.

Irish national.

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. EDWARD VIVIAN MORGAN CROFTON, R.E., was born in Dublin on 24th June 1889.

He was educated privately and at Cheltenham College, after which he took the three years' course at the City and Guilds Central Technical College, receiving the diploma of Associateship.

In August 1911 he entered the office of Messrs. Dolby and Williamson, consulting engineers, Westminster.

He joined the Royal Engineers (Spec. Res.), as 2nd Lieut. in June 1913, serving 8 months at Chatham and 4 months at Gibraltar. When war broke out, he trained a new Field Company of Royal Engineers for some months, and was promoted Lieutenant in 1916.

His death took place in action in France on 14th July 1917, at the age of twenty-eight.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.

George Alfred Manning: 18th July

Graduate 1913.

Pupil, London, Brighton and South Coast Railway Works.

2nd Lieutenant, Royal Engineers.

Awarded: Victory Medal, British War Medal and Military Cross.

1918 Obituary 

Lieut. GEORGE ALFRED MANNING, M.C., R.E., was born in Calcutta on 29th May 1891.

He was educated at St. Paul's School, West Kensington, and took the Mining Course at the University of Birmingham during 1908-9 and the Engineering Course at the Central Technical College, South Kensington, during 1909-11.

In October 1912 he entered as a pupil the locomotive works of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, and on completion of his course in 1915 he obtained a Commission in the Royal Engineers.

In 1917 he was awarded the Military Cross.

His death took place in action in France on 26th September 1917, at the age of twenty-six.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1913.

Leonard Herbert Wilson: 19th July

Associate Member 1902.

Resident & Constructional Engineer, Consolidated Main Reef Mines & Estates Co, Johannesburg.

Captain, South African Infantry Corps, 8th Regiment. Served in the South African Campaign, also in German South-West Africa.

Died in East Africa.

New Zealand national.

Archie McNicol Neilson: 9th August

Graduate 1912.

Apprenticed to William Simons & Co Ltd.

Fourth Engineer Officer, Mercantile Marine, SS "Canara".

Drowned in Mediterranean.

1918 Obituary 

ARCHIE McNICOL NEILSON was born at Paisley on 18th May 1893.

He was educated at the Public School and the Technical College, Paisley, and at the age of fifteen began an apprenticeship at the works of Wm. Simons and Co., Ltd., Renfrew.

In April 1914 he entered the service of the British Steam Navigation Co., Ltd., and from the outbreak of the War was on transport duty as fourth engineer on the Mesopotamian and other rout.

His death took place in the Mediterranean on 9th August 1917, the transport on which he was sailing being torpedoed. His remains were recovered and buried with naval honours in the British Cemetery at Naples.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.

William Brasier Hall: 23rd September

Graduate 1895; Member 1900.

Engineer, HMS "Duncan".

Engineer Commander, Royal Navy, HMS "Venerable".

Served on the Belgian Coast and in the Persian Gulf.

1918 Obituary 

Engineer-Commander WILLIAM BRASIER HALL, R.N., was born at Leeds on 13th February 1875.

His early education was received privately, after which he went to Torbay College, Torquay.

In 1890 he entered the Royal Naval Engineering College, Devonport, and was rated probationary assistant engineer in July 1894. He then attended the course of instruction at the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, until July 1895, when he obtained a first-class certificate, and was employed in the Fleet Reserve, at Devonport for a few months.

From March 1896 until August 1899 be served as assistant engineer in H.M.S. "Imperieuse," flagship of the Pacific Station, and then went to the Admiralty as Engineer Assistant from 1901 to 1904. As Engineer-Lieutenant he was appointed Assistant to the Engineer-Commander on the Staff of the Rear-Admiral commanding the Second Cruiser Squadron, during the visit of this squadron to the United States 1905 to 1907.

In 1910 he was sent to join H.M.S. "Fox" on the East Indies Station, and for services at the Persian Gulf he was awarded a medal. At that time also he received his promotion to Engineer-Commander.

During the early days of the War, his ship took part in the bombardment of the German batteries on the Belgian Coast, and later on he served throughout the Dardanelles campaign. In the autumn of 1913, he was taken ill whilst serving in the Mediterranean and came home with his ship, H.M.S. "Venerable," some months later. Whilst temporarily relieving another officer for a few weeks he became too seriously ill to remain on duty and was invalided.

His death took place at Stonehouse, Glos., on 23rd September 1917, in his forty-third year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1895, and a Member in 1900.

Henry Scott Manisty: 14th October

Graduate 1904; Associate Member 1911.

Assistant Engineer, Dundalk Iron Works.

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers.

Died in Belgium.

Awarded: Victory Medal, British War Medal and Military Cross: 'for an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy.'

1917 Obituary 

Lieut. HENRY SCOTT MANISTY, M.C., R.E., was born on 14th December 1885.

He was educated at Leamington College from 1896 to 1902, when he commenced to study at the Finsbury Technical College of the City and Guilds of London, and remained there until 1905.

Having worked for a short time in the Dundalk Iron Works, Ireland, he became assistant engineer to Messrs. Price and Reeves, contractors for the construction of the Charing Cross and Hampstead Tube, and the Immingham Docks.

In November 1909 he was engaged as engineer and agent for Messrs. Monro and Co., contractors for the Petersham filter beds for the Richmond (Surrey) Corporation.

From 1911 to August 1913 he was in the London office of Messrs. C. H. Walker and Co., assisting the chief engineer on the contracts for the building of the harbours at Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro, as well as for the Andes Summit Tunnel.

In the latter part of 1913 be went to California and studied at the University of California. While there, he carried out experiments in reinforced concrete and in mass concrete, but, owing to the War breaking out, he was unable to publish an account of them.

He returned to England, and rejoined the squadron of the Inns of Court Officers Training Corps, of which he had been a member for some years, and in October 1914 he obtained a Commission in the Royal Engineers Special Reserve.

He was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry on 25th June 1916 at Wieltje, when he was severely wounded.

His death took place during the Battle of Passchendaele near Ypres, Belgium on 14 October 1917, in his thirty-second year. He died of wounds and is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1904, and an Associate Member in 1911.

Reginald John Spink: 21st October

Graduate 1912; Associate Member 1915.

Mechanical Engineer, Rowland Brittain Patent Attorney, Vancouver.

Sergeant, Canadian Engineers, 10th Field Company.

Killed in action, Flanders.

1918 Obituary 

Serjeant REGINALD JOHN SPINK, Canadian Engineers, was born at Leeds on 30th April 1887.

His scholastic education was received in his native city, and at the age of fifteen he began a four-years' apprenticeship at the works of Messrs. Kitson and Co., Leeds. During that period he attended the evening courses at the Technical School and at Leeds University.

On the completion of his apprenticeship in 1906 he became a junior draughtsman at the works of Messrs. E. Green and Son, Wakefield, and in the following year he was sent to Germany to open a branch drawing office with the firm's German Co. at Cologne.

Having worked there for over three years, he returned to England in December 1910, and was engaged as clerk of works in charge of the erection of two waste-heat stations in Middlesbrough.

In 1912 be went to Canada and became mechanical engineer in the office of a Patent Attorney in Vancouver.

In 1915 he joined the Army, subsequently becoming Serjeant in the Canadian Engineers, and while holding this rank he was killed in action in Flanders on 21st October 1917, at the age of thirty.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1912, and an Associate Member in 1915.

Eric Earle Barnes: 7th November

Graduate 1910.

Premium Apprentice to London and North Western Railway Works.

Captain, Royal Flying Corps, 102nd Squadron.

Killed in action, France.

1918 Obituary 

Captain ERIC EARLE BARNES, R.E., was born in London on 17th August 1891.

His early education was acquired at a private school in Ealing and at St. Paul's School, Kensington.

In January 1909 he began an apprenticeship at the locomotive works of the London and North Western Railway, Crewe, and on its completion in 1912 he returned to London.

In 1914 he joined the Forces, receiving a Commission in the Royal Engineers, and in 1916 he was promoted to Captain.

His death took place in action in France on 7th November 1917, at the age of twenty-six.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1910.

Bertie Constantin Ruffell Grimwood: 7th/8th November

Associate Member 1912.

Inspecting Engineer, Crown Agents for the Colonies.

Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps, 4th Squadron, Royal Artillery.

Missing on the 7th, recorded as such on the 8th. Actual date of death unknown, probate record states 7th, in France/Belgium.

Missing in action, Somme.

Commemorated on the Arras Flying Services Memorial. Faubourg-d'Amiens Cemetery.

Awarded: Military Cross.

Gazette issue 30466, 08/01/1918. M.C. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Having located a strong force of enemy infantry coming up to counter attack, his machine was immediately afterwards hit by a shell which wounded him severely and destroyed his wireless apparatus. His machine was obviously so badly damaged that no expert would have believed it could have possibly held together in the air, but in spite of this and of his wounds he wrote out a message reporting the position of the enemy and dropped it on divisional headquarters who were able to put nine batteries on to the target. His pluck and devotion to duty were worthy of the highest praise. Awarded the Military Cross.

Note: missing and recorded missing dates from war record.

 

Arthur Norman Cousin: 7th December

Graduate 1912.

Student Demonstrator in Applied Mathematics, UCL.

Captain (Adjutant), York and Lancashire Regiment, 12th Battalion.

Killed in action, France.

1918 Obituary 

Captain ARTHUR NORMAN COUSIN, York and Lancaster Regiment, was born in London on 8th May 1891.

His early education was received at the High School, Dorking, after which he went to University College, London, where he graduated B.Sc., with 1st Class Honours (Engineering). Subsequently he became Student Demonstrator in Applied Mathematics at the same College.

In September 1914 he was gazetted Lieutenant in the York and Lancaster Regiment, promoted Captain a year later, and proceeded to Egypt in December 1915. He subsequently saw much service in France, occupying the post of Brigade Intelligence Officer, and shortly before his death was made Adjutant in his old Battalion.

He was killed in action on 7th December 1917, at the age of twenty-six.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.

Percy Cuthbert Douglass Douglass: 10th December

Graduate 1907; Associate Member 1912.

Resident Engineer, Buckie Harbour Extention Works.

Flight Commander, Royal Naval Air Force, 2 Wing Stravros (Pilot).

Killed in Sopwith Strutter No N5618, crash landing after combat over Imbros. Observer Lieutenant W Hinsley injured.

1918 Obituary 

Flight-Commander PERCY CUTHBERT DOUGLASS DOUGLASS, R.N.A.S., was born at St. Mary's, Scilly Isles, on 28th September 1886.

He was educated at Marlborough College and under private tutors, and at the age of nineteen was articled to his father, the late Mr. W. T. Douglass, of Westminster.

He received the practical side of his engineering education from 1906 to 1908 at the works of Messrs. Andrew Barclay and Co., Kilmarnock, the Steel Co. of Scotland, and Messrs. Simons and Co., Renfrew, after which he returned to assist his father in the preparation of plans, specifications, and inspections of lighthouse lanterns, apparatus, machinery, steel towers, gas buoys and gas-making plant.

In 1910 he was appointed assistant resident engineer for the Buckie Harbour Extension Works, which his father was building.

Two years later he returned to work in the London office, but was only there a few months before his father died. He then became head of the firm and carried on the work until shortly after the outbreak of the war. The chief work carried out by him in that year was in connexion with Buckie and other harbours in Banffshire, also the parade and marine drive at Exmouth, and his duties as engineer to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

In April 1915 he received a Commission as Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Naval .Division, but at the request of the Admiralty he shortly transferred to the Royal Naval Air Service for balloon work, with which he was well acquainted, owing to his pre-war experience in a Territorial Balloon Company. He went immediately to Gallipoli with a kite-balloon section, and during the campaign he was given command of the section and promoted to Lieutenant.

On his return to England in April 1916 he was lent temporarily to the Aerial Construction Corps and given command of a camp.

Early in 1917 he again went to the Eastern Mediterranean, and when there transferred to the aeroplane branch of the service. In September he was promoted to Flight-Commander.

His death took place from an aeroplane accident on 10th December 1917, at the age of thirty-one.

He was elected a Graduate of this institution in 1907, and an Associate Member in 1912.


1918

Gordon Porter Cable: 2nd January

Associate Member 1913.

Acting Deputy Executive Engineer, Bombay.

Captain, Indian Army, Indian Army Reserve of Officers, Jaipur Transport Corps.

Indian national.

Dudley Adams: 21st March

Graduate 1911; Associate Member 1918.

Engineer, Adams & Co.

Educated in Sydney.

Captain, Royal Field Artillery/ Royal Garrison Artillery, 130th Heavy Battery. Joined 1915.

Killed in action, France.

1918 Obituary 

Captain DUDLEY ADAMS, R.G.A., was born in Sydney on 2nd November 1890, being the elder son of W. J. Adams and grandson of the late William Adams who had been locomotive superintendent of several of the English Railways.

He was educated at Sydney, and served an apprenticeship at the locomotive works of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway from 1910 to 1913. During that period he also studied at the Brighton Technical School.

On the completion of his apprenticeship he worked for six months in the electrical shops of Messrs. Vickers, Ltd., Sheffield, which was followed by six months in the test-house at Messrs. C. A. Parsons, of Newcastle-on-Tyne.

He then returned to Australia, to join his father's engineering business, but in 1915 he returned to England and joined the Royal Field Artillery, serving in Gallipoli, Egypt, and France.

His death took place in action in France on 21st March 1918, at the age of twenty-seven.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1911, and although his name was in the Ballot List of 3rd May 1918 for election as an Associate Member, his death took place before it could be completed.

Douglas Roy Dilworth Harrison: 26th March

Associate Member 1912.

Mechanical Engineer, Prince Line Steamships.

Sergeant, Royal Fusiliers; then 2nd Liuetenant/Assistant Adjutant Durham Light Infantry.

Killed in action.

1918 Obituary 

Sec.-Lieut. DOUGLAS ROY DILWORTH HARRISON, Durham Light Infantry, was born at Burnley on 11th February 1883.

He was educated at Burnley Grammar School and Manchester Grammar School.

At the age of sixteen he began an apprenticeship of five years with Messrs. Clarke, Chapman and Co., of Gateshead, and on its completion in 1904 he remained with the firm in the drawing office for a year.

He then went to sea as 3rd Engineer with the Prince Line of Steamships, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, and became Chief Engineer in 1909.

In 1915 he entered the Royal Fusiliers, and subsequently became Serjeant, and later joined the Durham Light Infantry; becoming 2nd Lieut., Assistant Adjutant.

His death took place in action at Hamel on 26th March 1918, at the age of thirty-five.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1912.

William Kingo Armstrong: 11th April

Graduate 1913.

Student, Municipal School of Technology Manchester.

Captain, South Lancashire Regiment, 4th Battalion.

Killed in action.

1918 Obituary 

Captain WILLIAM KINGO ARMSTRONG, S. Lancashire Regiment, was born at Eccles, Manchester, on 22nd November 1891.

He received his early education at St. Anne's-on-Sea, afterwards entering the Manchester Grammar School, and on leaving in 1907 he became a student at the Manchester School of Technology.

Subsequently be became a pupil at the works of the British Westinghouse Co., remaining with that firm for eighteen months, and would have received his diplomas from the University at the end of his two years' studies if the War had not broken out. For five years he had been a member of the O.T.C. at the University, and prior to the War had passed the examination for a lieutenant.

Early in the first week of the War he accepted a Commission in the South Lancashire Regiment, and served with the Regiment until his death in action, in France, on 11th April 1918, at the age of twenty-six. In the action in which he fell, his Commanding Officer was killed, and the Major was dangerously wounded. Captain Armstrong was in command of the advance companies, but the Portuguese troops having been driven out of their trenches, the whole force of the enemy was directed against his Regiment, which fought in the open for three days, and nearly all of them perished.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1913.

George Leonard Andrews: 3rd May

Associate Member 1909; Member 1911.

Chief Engineer, Para Electric Railways & Lighting Co, Brazil.

Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery, 76th Siege Battery.

1919 Obituary 

Captain GEORGE LEONARD ANDREWS, R.G. A., was born in Calcutta on 12th November 1874.

He was educated at Wesley College, Sheffield, and at the Sheffield Technical School (afterwards the Applied Science Department of the Sheffield University), and in 1895 he became a pupil with the Brush Electrical Engineering Co., Ltd.

He further developed his experience in tramway construction and operation at Kidderminster, Madrid, and Hull, and in 1900 he became resident engineer to the Sunderland Corporation Tramways.

Three years later he was offered the post of engineer to the Lisbon Tramways, which he held until 1905 when he accepted an offer to become general manager and engineer to the Para Electric Railways and Lighting Co., Brazil.

Some years later, after practising for a time as a consulting engineer in Rio de Janeiro and Curityba, he accepted the offer of the important post of general manager and engineer to the Pernambuco Tramways and Power Co. He had begun constructional work when the War broke out, and he returned home to offer his services. After undergoing the necessary special training at an important coast station, he went to France, where he was in several actions.

He then volunteered for service in the East, and passed six months in Egypt and Syria, after which he returned to France and was through the battle of the Somme. Subsequently he became Liaison Officer and Temp. Major to a Portuguese brigade of heavy artillery, and did useful work by lecturing and translating several of the gunnery books into Portuguese.

He was killed in action on 3rd May 1918, at the age of forty-three, near Albert, while proceeding to an observation post.

He became a Member of this Institution in 1911; and was a Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers and of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, a B.Sc. (Load.) and a B.Eng. (Sheffield).

Maxwell Stanley Macaulay: 7th May

Graduate 1907; Associate Member 1913.

Irrigation Engineer, Zifta Circle of Irrigation, Egypt.

Second Lieutenant, BA, Lothians and Border Horse.

Died in Palestine.

1918 Obituary 

Lieut. MAXWELL STANLEY MACAULAY, Lothians and Border Horse, was born at Strathpeffer, Scotland, on 4th July 1887, and was educated at Daniel Stewart's College, Edinburgh.

He served an apprenticeship of seven years with Messrs. Lobnitz and Co., Ltd., of Renfrew, and also studied during the session 1905-6 at the Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh, and in 1906-7 at the University of Edinburgh.

In April 1910 he took up the appointment of assistant manager to the Egyptian Engineering Co., Ltd., Mansourah, and in December 1911 became head of designing works in the Egyptian Irrigation Department, being stationed at Zifta.

In 1914 be went to Athens and started as a consulting engineer, but the war put an end to the development of his business, and for a time he gave his services in various capacities to the E.E.F. at Gallipoli and Salonica. Failing to join the Forces while abroad — owing to the regulations — he returned to Scotland in 1916 and immediately joined the Lothians and Border Horse, and after a period of training received his Commission, returning to Salonica in December 1916.

Subsequently he was attached to the General Staff in Palestine, and was killed by a fragment of bomb dropped by an enemy aeroplane near Jericho on 7th May 1918, in his thirty-first year.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1907, and an Associate Member in 1913.

Frederick Lewis Shirley: 1st August

Associate Member 1911; Member 1916.

Assistant General Manager, Bengal Iron & Steel Co.

Private, Middlesex Regiment, 30th Battalion.

Died at home.

Bertram Hopkinson: 26th August

Member 1904 (life member).

Professor of Mechanism and Applied Mathmatics, Cambridge.

Colonel, Royal Air Force.

Awarded: Companion of St Michael and St George.

Killed in flying accident, England.

1918 Obituary 

Colonel BERTRAM HOPKINSON, C.M.G., F.R.S., was born in Birmingham on 11th January 1874, the eldest and only surviving son of the late Dr. John Hopkinson, F.R.S., Member of Council, I.Mech.E., and grandson of the late Mr. Alderman John Hopkinson, M.I.Mech.E., of Manchester.

He was educated at St. Paul's School and at King's College, London, and then proceeded to Trinity College, Cambridge. Owing to illness he took an aegrotat degree in the first part of the Mathematical Tripos of 1895 but in the following year he obtained a first class in the first division of Part II. He then read for the Bar and was called in 1897.

After the death of his father, through the tragic accident in Switzerland in 1898, which occurred while Bertram was on his way to Australia on legal business, he determined to give up his career at the Bar and to take up engineering to conserve his father's large practice as a consulting engineer, and joined his uncle Mr. Charles Hopkinson, M.I.Mech.E., and the late Mr. E. Talbot, a former assistant of Dr. John Hopkinson, as a partner in the firm of Hopkinsons and Talbot, of London and Manchester.

During his five years association with the firm he was jointly responsible for the electrification and extension of the Newcastle-on-Tyne Tramway system, described in a Paper before the Inst.C.E., and of the Leeds Tramway system; and also advised upon or carried out electric lighting or tramway schemes for the Corporations of Salford, Stockport, and Crewe, and the District Councils of Sale, Hindley, and Ambleside. During this time he was also frequently engaged as an expert in patent cases in the Law Courts. The position he attained in work of this character was recognized in later life by his frequently acting as assessor to the Judge in technical cases.

In 1903 Professor Ewing (now Sir J. Alfred Ewing, K.C.B.) retired from the Chair of Mechanism and Applied Mechanics in the University of Cambridge, and Bertram Hopkinson was appointed his successor, and held the Chair until his death. Under his guidance the Cambridge School of Engineering grew in numbers and prospered, and greatly extended its influence and repute, particularly as a home of advanced research. Professor Hopkinson was himself devoted to research and inspired his students with something of his own enthusiasm and originality, many of whom subsequently came to occupy positions of importance and responsibility in engineering industries.

His researches were very varied in character, and the papers he communicated to scientific societies and the technical institutions very numerous. They were all characterized by great originality, refusal to be bound by traditional methods and doctrines, directness of attack and a singular appreciation of the essential points involved.

He contributed to this Institution a series of Papers on "Indicated Power and Mechanical Efficiency of Gas-Engines," 1907; "Effect of Mixture Strength and Scavenging upon Thermal Efficiency," 1908; "Cooling of Gas Engines," 1913, and was awarded the Willans Premium for the first two of these.

Professor Hopkinson was co-inventor of the Hopkinson-Tring torsion meter, now largely used for measuring the shaft power of turbine-driven ships.

On the outbreak of war he threw himself unreservedly into the National Service, disregarding all other interests which would interfere therewith. He was then a Major of the O.T.C. at Cambridge.

First he took up R.E. work at Chatham, but a little later became attached to the Admiralty, where his work on explosions found full application and enabled him to undertake further work of great national importance. Afterwards he directed his attention to the equipment of air-craft, and was appointed to positions of successively increasing importance in connexion with the control of experimental work, at first with the War Office and then with the Air Ministry, where he became Deputy Director of Air-Craft Equipment. Here again his knowledge of internal-combustion engines and explosives, and originality of conception, were of the greatest value to the Nation. To quote from a letter of condolence to the University of Cambridge written by command of the Air Council, they place "on record their deep sense of the high and permanent value of the work done for the Flying Force by the late Colonel Hopkinson, and their recognition of the patriotic self-abnegation with which he devoted his great abilities and scientific attainments to the Public Service."

He was made a Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in 1917. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society and held a professorial fellowship at King's College, Cambridge. He became a Member of this Institution in 1904; he had served on the Council of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, and was a Member of the Council of the Royal Society, and of the Institution of Civil Engineers at the time of his death, and was an original member of the Advisory Council for Scientific and Industrial Research appointed by the Privy Council.

Colonel Hopkinson was killed in an accident whilst flying in England on military duty on 26th August 1918, at the age of forty-four.

William Goodliff Scotcher: 15th September

Graduate 1912; Associate Member 1918.

Assistant Locomotive Superintendent, Central Argentine Railway,

Captain, 50th and Lieutenant, 112 Squadron, Royal Air Force. Temporary 2nd Lieutenant, East Yorks Regiment.

Awarded: Mentioned in Dispatches and Military Cross:

'This decoration was awarded to William Goodliff Scotcher for an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy. C14/11/1916.'

1918 Obituary 

Captain WILLIAM GOODLIFF SCOTCHER, M.C., R.F.C., was born in London on 17th March 1890, and was educated at the East London Technical College.

He served a five-years' apprenticeship at the Great Eastern Railway Locomotive Works, Stratford, after which he was employed for a year and a half as a fitter on breakdown work in the running sheds and subsequently in the Drawing-office.

In April 1913 he went to the Argentine to take up a position as locomotive draughtsman on the Central Argentine Railway, and later in the same year he became an assistant locomotive superintendent on the Northern Section of that railway. Owing to the sudden shortage of coal in September 1914, he converted all the locomotives in his Section from coal to wood burning, and in the following month he sailed for England to join the Forces, eventually becoming a pilot in the Royal Flying Corps.

He saw service in Gallipoli, Egypt, and France, and was awarded the Military Cross at the Battle of the Somme.

Latterly he was engaged on the home front, and while flying in Kent his machine fell, owing to engine trouble, and he was instantaneously killed at Bekesbourne Aerodrome, near Canterbury, on 15th September 1918, at the age of twenty-eight.

He was elected a Graduate of this Institution in 1912, and an Associate Member in 1918.

At the time of winning the Military Cross he was the youngest Freeman of the City of London to gain this coveted honour.

Robert Andrew Hatton: 23rd October

Graduate 1902; Associate Member 1906.


Engineering Assistant/Draughtsman, WT Henley's Telegraph Co.

Major (Acting Lieutenant Colonel), Royal Field Artillery, 123rd Siege Battery.

Died of wounds, France.

1918 Obituary 

Major ROBERT ANDREW HATTON, R.F.A., was born in London on 27th July 1880, and was educated at the Grocers' Company's School.

He entered the works of W. T. Henley's Telegraph Co., Ltd., North Woolwich, in 1896, and after working in the shops he passed into the drawing office, where he took part in the designing and equipment of their Gravesend Works.

From 1906 to 1914 he was assistant engineer, during which time the works plant and its maintenance were under his supervision, and he also took part in the re-arrangement and extension of the factory at North Woolwich.

At the outbreak of the War he was a Captain in the Territorial Force, and volunteered for service abroad, and served some time in. Egypt and France.

He was gassed in France in June 1918, but recovered and returned in August, and served with the Third Army in command of a siege battery.

His death took place in France, from wounds received in action, on 23rd October 1918, at the age of thirty-eight.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1902, and an Associate Member in 1906.

Frederick Horace Reed: 23rd October

Graduate 1918.

Apprentice Marine Engineer to Vickers Naval Construction Works.

Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force, 6th Squadron.

Death registered in Westbury-on-Severn.

Note: evidently there was some confusion as to his death, see below. Also, Membership Form states, he was involved in the production of munitions and not released on active service but his war record suggests otherwise as does his place and manner of death.

1919 Obituary 

FREDERICK HORACE REED was born in London on 3rd September 1898, and was educated at the Latymer Upper School, Hammersmith.

In August 1916 he began an apprenticeship of five years in the marine engine department of the Naval Construction Works, Barrow-in-Furness, and during the same period he studied at the Barrow Technical School.

In May 1918 he joined the Royal Air Force, becoming a Corps Observer, but later in the year he was wounded in a fight over the German lines.

Subsequently, it was reported that he had died from his wounds and was buried by the Germans at the village where the machine came down.

His death took place on 23rd October 1918, at the age of twenty.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in May 1918.

 

Albert Henry Gort: 6th November

Graduate 1908.

Apprenticed to the Locomotive Dept, Metropolitan Railway.

Second Lieutenant, Royal Defence Corps, Territorial Force, 15/04/17. Temporary Lieutenant whilst Commandant Prisoner of War Camp, 09/01/18.

Probate document states, died Eastern Command Hospital, Cambridge. 

1919 Obituary 

Lieut. ALBERT HENRY GORT, Northamptonshire Regiment, was born at Felixstowe on 30th January 1890.

He was educated at the Ipswich Middle School and at the Regent Street Polytechnic, London.

His apprenticeship was served at the Metropolitan Railway Works, Neasden, where he passed through the various departments and the drawing office.

Owing to the illness of his father, he returned to Felixstowe to take charge of their coach building and transport work, and in September 1914, he joined the Suffolk Yeomanry, going to the Dardanelles as a machine gunner.

Having being invalided home, he was given a Commission in the Northamptonshire Regiment, and placed on anti-aircraft service at Sheerness, after which he was sent to various stations to learn the working of prisoners-of-war camps.

He was then appointed to the Eastern Command, and fitted up camps at Saffron Walden, Stanstead, Standon, and Bishop's Stortford, of which he was appointed Camp Commandant.

His death took place at Cambridge, from pneumonia, following influenza, on 5th November 1918, in his twenty-ninth year.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1908.

 

Henry Godfrey Andrews: 22nd November

Associate Member 1909.

Assistant Borough Electrical Engineer, Bournemouth.

Commissioned Temporary Sub-Lieutenant Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
7/10/14, Temporary Lieutenant 28/2/15, Temporary Lieutenant Commander 1/7/15; Nelson Battalion Mediterranean Expeditionary Force 1/3/15-14/7/15. Ship 'Greenol'.

Gunshot Wound left leg, invalided to UK 13/9/15.

Draft for British Expeditionary Force 18/1/18, joined Nelson Battalion 20/1/18-7/3/18 attached to Commander Royal Engineers, 27/3/18.

Pyrexia unknown origin, invalided to UK 30/3/18; 2nd in Command 2nd Reserve Battalion 5/7/18-22/11/18.

Died of Influenza & Pneumonia in Wellesley House Hospital, Aldershot (wife present).

1919 Obituary 

Lieutenant-Commander HENRY GODFREY ANDREWS, R.N.V.R., R.N.D., was born at East London, South Africa, on 18th November 1883.

His general education was received at Salisbury School and Norwich Grammar School, and then he served an apprenticeship of three years with Messrs. J. W. Brooke and Co., Ltd., Adrian Iron Works, Lowestoft.

In 1902 he was engaged in the drawing office of Messrs. Lacey and Sillar, consulting engineers, Westminster, and in the following year acted as their representative in charge of the overhead construction of the Swindon Corporation tramways.

In 1904 he became Assistant Borough Electrical Engineer to the Bournemouth Corporation, and held this post until 1908 when he joined the firm of Goddard, Massey and Warner, of Nottingham, and four years later he went to Canada.

On the outbreak of the War he applied for a Commission, which he received in October 1914 in the Royal Naval Division.

In 1915 he went to the Dardanelles and was promoted on the field to Lieut.-Commander. He was afterwards badly wounded, which kept him at home for some time.

In January 1918 he went to France as second in command of the Nelson Battalion. He suffered great hardships during the German advance in the following March, and was sent home with trench fever and a slight attack of gas.

Not having regained his strength, he succumbed to influenza and pneumonia, and died on 22nd November 1918, at the age of thirty-five.

He was elected an Associate Member of this Institution in 1909.

John Vick Thomas: 3rd December

Associate Member 1907.

Chief Engineers Asisstant, Mr Henry J Weaver.

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers.

Robert Frearson Domleo: 10th December

Graduate 1912.

Apprenticed to Midland Railway.

Lieutenant, Royal Engineers, Temporary 2nd Lieutenant (promoted 12 May 1917).

1919 Obituary 

Lieut. ROBERT FREARSON DOMLEO, R.E., was born at Breaston, Derbyshire, on 28th August 1892.

He was educated at Derby School, and served his apprenticeship in the locomotive works and drawing office of the Midland Railway, Derby.

At the time that War was declared in August 1914 he was about to continue his training on the foot-plate, but deemed it his duty to join the Army, and enlisted as a Private in the 21st Batt., Royal Fusiliers, seeing active service at Festubert, Givenchy, etc. He was sent to Oxford Lin March 1916 to qualify for a Commission, and was gazetted 2nd Lieut. in 12th Sherwood Foresters in August 1916, subsequently returning to France in September 1916.

In April 1917 he was transferred to the Royal Engineers, R.O.D., and promoted to Lieutenant in February 1918, being stationed successively at Bergue, Bolozele, and Boulogne, where he was engaged in forwarding and conveying ammunition to the Front.

His death took place at Boulogne, after an attack of influenza followed by pneumonia, on 10th December 1918, at the age of twenty-six.

He became a Graduate of this Institution in 1912.


1919

Thomas Edward Goodeve OBE: 26th January

Associate Member 1906; Member 1914.

Manager and Assistant Locomotive Superintendent, Southern and Western Railway.

Royal Engineers. Operations in Egypt, including Sollum. He was at the engagement at Agagir on 26/2/1916. 

Major, Egyptian Expeditionary Force.

Buried, Damascus Commonwealth War Cemetery, Dimashq, Syria, Plot E4.

Awarded: Mentioned in Dispatches and OBE. 

Note: date of death from his war record, his grave in Damascus and the Gazette (reported/printed) is given as 1919 but our obituary states 1918.

1919 Obituary 

Major THOMAS EDWARD GOODEVE, O.B.E., R.E., was born in London on 5th August 1876.

He was educated at St. Paul's School and at the Royal College of Science and School of Mines.

In 1896 he became a premium apprentice in the locomotive works of the London and North Western Railway at Crewe, and on its completion he entered the drawing office of the same works, subsequently becoming in January 1902 assistant manager in the locomotive works.

This position he held until 1909 when he was transferred to the Outdoor Department and later to the Steel Works.

Two years later he became assistant manager on locomotive repairs at Crewe and out-station erecting shops, and in December 1913 he was appointed works manager and assistant locomotive superintendent at the Inchicore Works of the Great Southern and Western Railway, Dublin.

In 1916 he joined the Royal Engineers and served in Palestine from January 1917 until 26th January 1918, when he was accidentally killed at Baalbeck, Syria, at the age of forty-one. On two occasions he was personally congratulated by the Commander-in-Chief for his efficient work.

He became an Associate Member of this Institution in 1906, and a Member in 1914.

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